To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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Swimmer’s Shoulder

by Deanna Camilo PT, DPT, OCS  Faculty Practice / Clinical Education Director   Whether you’re a competitive swimmer, triathlete, or swim just for fun/fitness, if you’ve spent any significant amount of time in the pool you’ve likely experienced at least one episode of shoulder pain.  As a swammer (that’s a former swimmer for those of you who are new to swimming lingo), I experienced my first episode of shoulder pain at age 10 and had shoulder surgery when I was 13.  When I look back on this experience, through the eyes of a physical therapist, I truly believe that the surgery could have been prevented if I had received a comprehensive analysis of my movement mechanics rather than everyone simply…

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Eating Disorders, RED-S and Physical Therapy

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT* Many people are familiar with eating disorders and disordered eating, but there is a significant amount of myth, misinformation and stigma surrounding these topics. There are 8-10 million Americans struggling with eating disorders. This statistic includes diagnoses of anorexia, bulimia, compulsive over-eating, and non-specific eating disorders that do not squarely fit into another category. A true eating disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis and may be accompanied by other psychiatric diagnoses, including depression, anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Anorexia has a 12x higher mortality rate for girls 15-24 years of age than all other causes of death. Eating disorders are often overlooked and missed by parents, friends, coaches, teachers, and healthcare professionals. Therefore, it…

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The Athletic Hip Series: The Various Hamstring Injuries

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy Anyone who has had, or knows someone who has had, a hamstring tear knows it can look pretty bad. Typically people will report pain, hearing a pop, and a deep, ugly bruise that shows up a couple of days later that can extend past the knee. Even though this sounds really dramatic those are the kinds of injuries you actually want to have, because after the initial inflammation they tend to heal fairly quickly. Then there are the more common and much less talked about tendiopathies. These are the injuries that come on slowly and you do not notice until it’s almost too late. They are…

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Lessons From A Hypermobile Physical Therapist

By: Ted Ziaylek PT, DPT Hypermobility is used to describe joints that can bend further than normal. It is also commonly referred to as being “double jointed”. There are many things that can cause hypermobility. In basic terms the structures surrounding the joints (ligaments and capsules) are loose, which allows the joint to bend further than normal. I have learned a few things from working with patients who are hypermobile, as well as being hypermobile myself, about ways to help protect your joints. Firstly, people who are hypermobile often feel like they need to stretch. The problem here is that due to the laxity (or loose ligaments) in the joint we tend to stretch the joint well before the muscle….

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Understanding Chronic Pain: It’s All In Your Head

By: Deanna Camilo, PT, DPT The first thing we need to know in order to begin our understanding of pain is that pain is a product of the brain’s interpretation of two things: An unpleasant sensation. The circumstances surrounding the introduction of the unpleasant sensation. All sensory information (touch, vision, taste, etc.) must be evaluated by the nervous system, and accurate interpretation of this information depends on the context surrounding the introduction of the sensation.  Pain does not become pain until the brain interprets the sensation as dangerous or threatening. “Dangerous or threatening” is determined by contextual clues provided by the rest of the body: emotions, previous memories, and potential consequences of each response. Thus, the amount of pain you…

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The Athletic Hip Series-Athletic Pubalgia

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy Athletic Pubalgia is more commonly known as a Sports Hernia. People with a Sports Hernia will initially complain of groin pain that spreads to the inner thigh as the condition progresses. With the possible involvement of the genitor-femoral nerve, it can also present with numbness or other nerve-related symptoms in the thigh, the scrotum in males, and  the pubis in females. Most often the pain is aggravated by extreme and repetitive twisting, turning, or extending the affected hip and primarily affects football, hockey, tennis and soccer players. This diagnosis can be a frustrating one for the patient and clinician alike due to the fact that it…

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The Gift of the Arts

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT February 2015 has seen my dream become a reality.  In the first 2 weeks of the month, I will have seen six live performances; “Tuck Everlasting” at the Alliance Theater, “Romeo and Juliet” and “Snow White” with the Company and Fellowship dancers at Atlanta Ballet, Alvin Ailey on tour at the Fox Theater, and Several Dancers Core at Callanwolde.  When it comes down to it, I am a fan first.  I am a fan of dance, of performing, of expression, and of music.  It is my honor to also treat these talented and physical beings.  I get as much joy out of watching my 12 year-old patient perform as Clara for the…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Snapping Hip

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy As odd as it may sound, have you ever heard a strange noise coming from your hip? A rare condition, Snapping Hip can create a sense of alarm, not because of the pain, but because of the loud snapping noise referred to in its name.  The sound is created by one of two things: The IT Band snapping over the head of the femur. The Iliopsoas Tendon (hip flexor muscle) ineffectively stabilizing the joint, causing it to click as it moves through its range of motion. Both of these scenarios are not cause for immediate concern, but reflect incorrect biomechanics occurring at the hip. If you…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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Motion Stability