The Athletic Hip Series: Trochanteric Bursitis

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS Do you have lateral hip pain that is painful to lay on? If so, then you may have trochanteric bursitis. “What is bursitis,” you ask? Well bursitis is inflammation of the bursa that lies between the IT band and greater trochanter. When the IT band it too tight, it can rub on the bursa causing inflammation and irritation. As we discussed in my previous post, the IT band can get tight from a number of factors but most primarily from decreased strength of the hip abductors/glutes. When the bursa is inflammed it can get swollen and be painful to the touch or even to lie on it. Some people will experience pain when…

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Mythbusters: PT- Mommy Style

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The Myth: Running with a jogging stroller and baby is not that much different from running before pregnancy and should not be so difficult to perform. This is a common thought we have heard from our mommy patients over the years who often get frustrated with returning to their workouts after having a  baby. Specifically women, who may regularly run for exercise before or during pregnancy at an average of 15-20 miles per week, have difficulty returning to running even 1-2 miles at a time 6-12 months after having a baby. The proposed culprit to this obstacle: the jogging stroller. It would seem that simply pushing something on wheels would not so drastically…

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Balance Slow to Run Fast

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Have you ever taken the time to look at how you run? It’s an amazingly efficient combination of movements in the human body. If you take a closer look you’ll notice a few key elements: It’s a controlled fall. When both feet are in the air you are momentarily floating in air as your body prepares to land. When you land, it is not a giant disaster. You load and absorb your weight while also storing energy to bounce right back. Studies show that you absorb between 1.5 to 3 times your body weight upon impact, yet you hardly feel it! During your stance phase, when your foot is on the ground,…

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What is Piriformis Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS If a patient comes in with posterior hip pain or radiating pain down their leg, a lot of times they have already self-diagnosed themselves with Piriformis Syndrome. However, Piriformis Syndrome is not as common as most people think. So, what actually is Piriformis Syndrome? Piriformis Syndrome is when the pirifomis muscle is irritated because it is being overutilized. This is usually secondary to weak lateral hip musculature i.e. your glutes… sensing a theme?? The piriformis muscle extends along the back and lateral side of your hip. When it is aggravated it can cause a deep achey sensation in sitting, walking, or running. Sometimes the muscle becomes tight from overuse and can compress the…

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You’ve Got Some Nerve…

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People fall. People get hurt. Injuries usually get better… as we would hope. There are many cases, however, when common injuries that we think would get better over time do not. Here’s a case in which I have seen people have traumatic injuries such as slipping and falling on an outstretched arm, causing wrist and forearm pain. Most people, including physicians and physical therapists, would assume it’s a wrist injury such as a ligament sprain or fracture, and in most cases, it probably is. But let’s say the injured arm now presents with tingling, redness, or swelling. Now what do you think that may be coming from? One structure that is commonly…

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Training for a Boston Marathon – Interview with Dr. Laura Gold, PT (Part 2)

Our very own Dr. Laura Gold is running the Boston Marathon, which is only a few days away.  Training for a marathon is no easy task, but Dr. Gold has done an amazing job balancing her training and patient care here at the clinic. We sat down with Dr. Gold to ask about her experiences training for the Boston marathon.   What have you done to prepare? I did a conservative training plan, so I didn’t focus on speed but instead on distance. While I did include some speedwork and higher mileage weeks, I was just focused on completing the marathon. I already had the base to do a 15 mile long run, and I built up to a 24…

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Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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Training for a Boston Marathon – Interview with Dr. Laura Gold, PT

Our very own Dr. Laura Gold, PT is running the Boston Marathon, which is exactly one week away. Training for a marathon is no easy task, but Dr. Gold has done an amazing job balancing her training and patient care here at clinic. We sat down with Dr. Gold to ask her about her experiences training for the Boston marathon. Why did you choose to do the Boston Marathon? I choose Boston because it’s the “race of all races”.  It’s a bucket list item that all runners want to do. It is my second marathon, so it is a bit unusual. I have been running since I was 11, and I’ve always done half marathons. Last year I decided to…

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The Athletic Hip Series: What is IT Band Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS IT, otherwise known as the Iliotibial Band, is a common source of lateral knee pain in runners. However, most people do not realize that this is an issue oftentimes stemming from the hip. Pain generated from disorders of the IT band can be present at its origination along the lateral pelvis all the way to the lateral knee. The IT band is usually over-utilized due to poor lower extremity mechanics. Weak hip musculature, primarily the glutes, cause increased reliance on the IT band to stabilize the knee. This scenario can cause the IT band to get caught in a “catch-22”: overuse of the IT band causes increased tightness of the TFL (Tensor Fascia…

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My Numbness and Tingling Continue, but My Testing Does Not Show Anything!

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Many times we get patients in our clinic who experience ongoing or unresolved nerve symptoms. This can include things such as tingling, numbness, a pinched nerve in the neck, herniated disc, or burning pain that they know is coming from a nerve condition, such as sciatica. The patient may go through exhaustive testing by MRI, which rules out significant involvement from a herniated disc. Or they could participate in an EMG or Nerve Conduction Study which shows the nerve is conducting fine. And yet, the patient still has nerve-like symptoms. This results in the health practitioner sending the patient to physical therapy to try something like traction, whick does not help long term…

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Motion Stability