Innovative Leaders

 

Innovative Leaders

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As you may have read from Beth’s previous blog October is National Physical Therapy month which means it’s a pretty busy month at our clinic. I can say from personal experience that it has been quite a whirlwind! This is the month that our national organization (APTA) has designated to advocate for the profession and really tell the world what we do and how Physical Therapy can play an important role in your life. That being said, there are a lot of events that all occur within this month’s short 31 days. The slogan for national PT month is “Move Forward” www.moveforwardpt.com. That can mean many things, but here at Motion Stability we have taken that…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Labral Tears

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS For all of you clinicians out there who participated in our journal club in June you were able to hear from one of Atlanta’s preeminent hip surgeons, Dr. Cliff Willimon. He addressed the assessment and treatment of hip pathologies primarily related to labral tears. So, it is only natural that I follow my last blog on hip impingement with a discussion on hip labral tears. For the layperson out there, you may be asking, “What is a labral tear and could I have this tear?” Well, the labrum of your hip is a cartilaginous ring that runs around the perimeter of your hip socket. This allows the ball to sit deeper in the…

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Celebrations!

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS Exciting things are happening around Motion Stability and I would like to use my monthly blog to do things a bit differently and celebrate our happenings with you as part of our Motion Stability family! Many of you may recall SNOWMAGEDDON in Atlanta earlier this year, which left us all stranded in our homes… or on the side of the road… or a random stranger’s home or a hotel. For us as Motion Stability, we utilized our time home at the start of a new year to discuss many of our goals for the upcoming year as a group. One of our goals was to further develop our expertise as a clinic in…

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Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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Is Back Pain All in Your Head?

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT What a great article from NPR! This article identifies that recurring back problems are not solely from the structure in your spine such as a herniated disc or degeneration or the vertebra, but rather it brings attention to the nervous system itself. Your nervous system, located within your spine, is your main transducer that signals to your brain that you are or are not in pain. This article states: “Research is showing that the pain often has nothing to do with the mechanics of the spine, but with the way the nervous system is behaving, according to Dr. James Rainville of New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.” “This is a different way…

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Because, Who is Perfect? Get Closer.

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS A big thank you goes out to our Christina for posting this link on her Facebook page! I was so moved by it that I couldn’t help but steal it for this month’s blog post! In today’s world where we all strive for perfection, the question becomes what is perfect and why are we trying so hard to achieve such an ambiguous notion? This article brought me back to what first drew me to the Physical Therapy profession and that is celebrating the body and abilities that you were given and making the most out of whatever you have. Maybe there’s a lesson in this for all of us, especially while starting on…

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How is a Pinched Nerve Treated?

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT When treating a pinched nerve it is important to take pressure off the nerve so the nerve can conduct properly. In Physical Therapy, we can use mechanical traction or hands-on techniques to reduce the nerve compression. With these techniques we look for a reduction of pain and intensity. Typically, the further the symptoms go down the arm or leg, the worse the nerve symptoms are. Therefore, any treatment that the patient feels their symptoms are lessening further down the leg or arm means that the nerve is being pinched less. The nerve itself should also be treated. When the nerve is pinched it can become inflamed and irritated. We use techniques called nerve…

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Have Pain in the Arch or Heel of Your Foot?

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Pain in the arch or heel of your foot is commonly diagnosed as ‘plantar fascitis’. However, there are several reasons that can cause pain at the bottom of the foot. Accurate diagnosis of the source of symptoms is needed to direct the proper course of action. This includes: Plantar Fascitis: Usually due to an over-stretched arch from a flat or high arch. Treatment by taping, manual therapy, orthotics, and use of night splints can provide relief. Long term prognosis is based not only treating the plantar fascitis itself, but also restoring proper mechanics of the entire leg. Nerve Pain: The tibial nerve, which is a branch of the sciatic nerve originating from…

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Do Your Knees Hurt After Jogging?

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT It is common for joggers to have knee pain. It is usually due to a combination of improper strength and flexibility not only at the knee, but also the hip and foot. The hip is designed to absorb a majority of shock, as well as produce power through the gluteal muscles. The foot contacts the ground and provides proper ground reaction forces up the kinetic chain. If the hip or foot do not work correctly, the knee undergoes increased stress. Like a paper clip bending repetitively, injuries at the knee can then occur. In runners, pain can present itself in the front (i.e. patellar pain), outside (i.e. iliotibial band syndrome), or along the…

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