Learn About Jozy Altidore’s Hamstring Injury, the Motion Stability way.

 

Learn About Jozy Altidore’s Hamstring Injury, the Motion Stability way.

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT Have you been watching the World Cup lately? Whether you’re into soccer or not, its hard to avoid all the World Cup news and updates. One of the recent updates is that Jozy Altidore, the US team’s premier striker alongside Clint Dempsey, will not be able to participate in tomorrow’s match versus Germany. This is the World Cup, the top competition for soccer worldwide, and so the conditions are no doubt intense. The weather’s heat and humidity has played a factor, as evident from the water break needed during US match versus Portugal this past Sunday. The level of competition and expectations from worldwide fans are also intense as well. With…

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Mythbusters: PT- Mommy Style

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The Myth: Running with a jogging stroller and baby is not that much different from running before pregnancy and should not be so difficult to perform. This is a common thought we have heard from our mommy patients over the years who often get frustrated with returning to their workouts after having a  baby. Specifically women, who may regularly run for exercise before or during pregnancy at an average of 15-20 miles per week, have difficulty returning to running even 1-2 miles at a time 6-12 months after having a baby. The proposed culprit to this obstacle: the jogging stroller. It would seem that simply pushing something on wheels would not so drastically…

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Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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Are you ready to HIIT the gym?

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS Cross fit. P90X. Insanity. T25. Boot Camp. Fit Wit. WOD. Tabata. Though it comes in many names and various packages, high intensity interval training (HIIT) has become one of the most popular workouts of recent times. A HIIT workout is characterized by alternating short bursts of exercise at near maximal effort with little periods of rest. Due to the high intensity of exercise, these workouts are typically of shorter duration than traditional exercise programs in order to burn the same or more amounts of body fat. HIIT exercisers will also notice a strong improvement in aerobic capacity, or cardiovascular endurance. Thus, many endurance athletes are turning to HIIT workouts as a form of…

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How Should Health Practitioners be Rated?

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Here‘s an interesting article from the New York Times about the fact that there are limited resources to determine how to find the right doctor for you. With rising health care costs, including higher insurance premiums; limits in health providers as part of your insurance network; and simply more access to health information via the internet; patients are becoming wiser consumers when deciding which health practitioner they choose to trust in taking care of their personal health. The article discusses how there are health rating websites that rank or rate practitioners, as well as allows practitioners to share their credentials and offer personal video instructions. Medicare and other agencies are also trying…

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What Can I Do to Prevent an ACL Injury?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT An ACL injury is usually due to the knee going into excessive valgus (knee turning inwards) and/or some type of rotary /pivot force. Many people focus on training the musculature around the knee such as the quad and hamstrings. This does help, but one must also consider the stability of the joints above and below – which would be the hips and ankle/foot complex.The knee can be viewed as a junction between two different stilts. If the hip is not stable or has excessive mobility, or the foot / ankle is not supportive such as excessive flat feet or stiff ankles from an old ankle sprain – it can place excessive valgus force at…

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How do I manage my back pain on a daily basis?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT First, remain positive. Many people dealiing with chronic back pain can become discouraged and even depressed that their pain does not let them do what they want to do. This can lead to a fear-avoidance belief that takes them away from doing activities that they physically should be able to do.  From there it is important to establish 2-3 activites during the day that cause back pain – such as sitting, standing, or household activities such as vacuuming. It is just as important to determine the time in which the pain begins. Many patients will complain of pain with a prolonged/sustained activity after 10-20 minutes. What this means is that the muscle endurance of…

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What can I do for knee pain?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Treating knee pain depends on the location and severity of the symptoms. If it is swollen, you should apply cold packs, compress, and elevate it to reduce swelling. You should consider contacting a qualified physician or physical therapist to assess your injury.  If things are clear for any significant injury – and as swelling calms – determining where the location of knee pain helps guide things you can do to treat it. Commonly pain is in either behind the knee cap or along the inside border. You may get a diagnosis of chondromalcia patella or patelofemoral pain which indicates that your knee cap is not tracking correctly along its groove. And with this pain,…

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How can I prevent repeat ankle sprains?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT It is important to improve ankle dorsiflexion after an ankle sprain. Research indicates a loss of ankle mobility with chronic ankle sufferers – primarily in ankle dorsiflexion – which is the motion you need to walk correctly. Reserach also indicates a change in muscle control patterns not only in the ankle but also up the kinetic chain, such as a loss of hip control. Therefore: 1. Improve ankle dorsiflexion: calf stretching, seeing a Physical Therapist to mobilize your ankle and decrease swelling. 2. Ankle stability: ankle circles, resistance bands to strengthen lateral/medial ankle musculature/tendons. 3. Ankle proprioception: standing balance exercises as indicated 4. Hip stability: primarily with gluteus maximus and medius exercises. It is…

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Does stretching decrease the chance of getting injured?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Most people present with imbalances in muscle forces. This may include anterior – posterior muscles and specific muscles affect joint mechanics. It is recommended that you have a qualified health practitioner assess your body mechanics to make recommendations what muscles should be elongated, and then other that should be stabilized to improve the efficiency of you body. Also consider tight muscles may be due to an underlying irritated nerve. Many people with old sciatic nerve injuries feel tightness in their hamstring, however attempting to over-stretching the hamstring can aggravate the nerve again. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is…

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