You’ve Got Some Nerve…

 

You’ve Got Some Nerve…

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People fall. People get hurt. Injuries usually get better… as we would hope. There are many cases, however, when common injuries that we think would get better over time do not. Here’s a case in which I have seen people have traumatic injuries such as slipping and falling on an outstretched arm, causing wrist and forearm pain. Most people, including physicians and physical therapists, would assume it’s a wrist injury such as a ligament sprain or fracture, and in most cases, it probably is. But let’s say the injured arm now presents with tingling, redness, or swelling. Now what do you think that may be coming from? One structure that is commonly…

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Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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My Numbness and Tingling Continue, but My Testing Does Not Show Anything!

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Many times we get patients in our clinic who experience ongoing or unresolved nerve symptoms. This can include things such as tingling, numbness, a pinched nerve in the neck, herniated disc, or burning pain that they know is coming from a nerve condition, such as sciatica. The patient may go through exhaustive testing by MRI, which rules out significant involvement from a herniated disc. Or they could participate in an EMG or Nerve Conduction Study which shows the nerve is conducting fine. And yet, the patient still has nerve-like symptoms. This results in the health practitioner sending the patient to physical therapy to try something like traction, whick does not help long term…

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Exercises To Prevent Lower Back Pain

What Exercises for My Core Can Help Prevent Lower Back Pain? Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT First – generally there are different roles of muscles in your trunk. Typically the smaller ones closest to your spine are considered ‘local’ muscles. Such muscles as the transversus abdominis, diaphragm, pelvic floor, and lumbar multifidus provide segmental control of your lumbar vertebra. Real-time ultrasound imaging can be used to visualize the proper contraction of these muscles as we cannot see these muscles from the superficial skin. So first step in core stability is to ensure that the smaller muscles are engaging properly. Then you have ‘global’ muscles which are the larger muscles – such as rectus abdominis, obliques, paraspinal muscles. These muscles…

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What Can I Do to Prevent an ACL Injury?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT An ACL injury is usually due to the knee going into excessive valgus (knee turning inwards) and/or some type of rotary /pivot force. Many people focus on training the musculature around the knee such as the quad and hamstrings. This does help, but one must also consider the stability of the joints above and below – which would be the hips and ankle/foot complex.The knee can be viewed as a junction between two different stilts. If the hip is not stable or has excessive mobility, or the foot / ankle is not supportive such as excessive flat feet or stiff ankles from an old ankle sprain – it can place excessive valgus force at…

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Will I Need Physical Therapy After Hip Replacement Surgery?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT It is recommended that you work with a skilled Physical Therapist after hip replacement surgery. The Physical Therapist will coordinate with the operating surgeon to improve your hip range of motion, strength, and progress your weightbearing and walking on your hip appropriately. They will also demonstrate to you safe and proper movement with your hip with functional activities such as sitting to standing, getting in / out of cars, and progress you back to your other functional and recreational goals.   _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your…

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How Can a Weak Core Lead to Back Pain?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT According to Panjabi’s model, we can view spinal stabiilty based on 3 key elements:1. Passive Structures: The spinal column itself and the ligaments, fascia and other static tissues that hold it together. 2. Active Structures: The muscles that surround the trunk and pelvis ‘actively’ contract to provide muscle support. 3. Cognitive / Motor Control: The brain has a way to coordinate how muscles will be used to anticipate how the spine is used with functional activities. The passive structures and the spine itself is limited in its ability to stabilize the spine, especially in dynamic function or prolonged positions such as standing or sitting. The brain thus needs to coordinate the proper timing of…

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How Is Rehabilitation Used to Treat Neck and Back Pain?

In Physical Therapy we treat neck and back pain by the following interventions: 1. Examination: Take a thorough subjective and physical examination to determine the causes and severity of pain. The examination helps determine what specific interventions need to be done. Each patient is unique in the medical history and interventions should also be individualized to the patient’s progress. 2. Reduce Pain: Especially in more severe pain complaints, it is important to reduce the symptoms to allow for the patient to simply feel less pain. This can include manual therapy to decrease muscle spasms, restricted joint mobility, or decrease nerve irritation. Modalities such as ultrasound, electrical stimulation and traction can also be used. 3. Restore Motion: As pain decreases, it…

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Custom Orthotics and Low Back Pain

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT The way the foot contacts the ground significantly affects the way your back absorbs compression to the spine. People who are flat foot footed can lead to decreased hip stability and motion. This is due to the foot not being able to provide proper support each time you step or stand on them. Over time the entire leg musculature, most importantly in the gluteal muscles lose their ability to provide proper support. This can lead to increased stress to the back…like jamming your thumb into a wall a thousand times over…you back gets ‘jammed’ or compressed.Proper orthotic fitting can help the feet be placed in better alignment and thus provide proper support for the…

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Can high-arched feet have any complications?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People with high-arches typically have less give in their foot as compared to those with flat arches. It can affect different body parts. With a more rigid support at the arch there tends to be greater forces dispersed at the heel and ball of the foot. Whether it be callouses, neuromas, or spurs many times they are formed due to excessive forces on that area. People with high-arches also tend to walk on their outside of their foot This makes them have more weight-bearing forces to along the outside of their legs. Commonly you see associated problems with ankle sprains, lateral knee pain such as iliotibial band syndrome (ITB), or lateral hip pain. There…

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