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The Athletic Hip Series: Trochanteric Bursitis

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS

Do you have lateral hip pain that is painful to lay on? If so, then you may have trochanteric bursitis. “What is bursitis,” you ask? Well bursitis is inflammation of the bursa that lies between the IT band and greater trochanter. When the IT band it too tight, it can rub on the bursa causing inflammation and irritation. As we discussed in my previous post, the IT band can get tight from a number of factors but most primarily from decreased strength of the hip abductors/glutes. When the bursa is inflammed it can get swollen and be painful to the touch or even to lie on it. Some people will experience pain when rising to stand after having been sitting for a while.

Usually when strengthening of the glutes and soft tissue work to loosen up the IT band, the inflammation in the bursa will gradually subside as will the pain. A skilled physical therapist can use a variety of techniques to decrease the inflammation and improve the glute strength to prevent and further reliance on the IT band.

This is not something that should go on forever, but oftentimes it will if not treated appropriately. Have us take a look and we can prevent you from a long period of downtime by diagnosing it quickly and getting you back on your feet!

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