National Physical Therapy Month: Pt 1

 

National Physical Therapy Month: Pt 1

October is finally here! The weather is beginning to get a little cooler, pumpkin spice things are everywhere, the arguments over who loves/hates candy corn have started, and National Physical Therapy Month is upon us! The APTA started this celebration of physical therapists and our profession in 1992 and has continued to promote and encourage this wonderful profession for the past 25 years!     Each year there is a theme to National Physical Therapy Month and the theme for 2017 follows the APTA Move Forward campaign #ChoosePT. The APTA is encouraging the community to #ChoosePT as a safer alternative to opioids for the treatment of non-cancer related pain.  Opioids have become a “go-to” medication for patients with pain, but…

Read More

Tis’ The Stressful Season!

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT How many of you feel this underlying tension or anxiety during this time of season? So when you say to someone Happy Holidays!!! – with a sense of cheer, peace and joy there’s also this funny vibe in you that says “ohhhh man…ever since Thanksgiving I am so stressed because I have end of the year things to take care of at work, at home, my kids’ school, getting ready for family coming over, buying gifts, dealing with traffic..and now I or my loved one has a winter cold. All at the same time! Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!”Perhaps you do not think that at all..and that’s simply just me.Even if it is just me, I…

Read More

The Value of Pain: Leprosy

Post by: Laura Gold, PT, DPT Leprosy. We’ve almost all heard of it and many of us, at a very early age. It is a common topic in biblical stories and a horrible disease of “biblical” proportions. Leprosy is not nearly as ubiquitous and devastating as it once was — it is far less common, and we have much better means of treating it. Unfortunately, it is still a problem in poorer areas of the world in which people don’t have access to healthcare. But this post isn’t about the epidemiology of leprosy and steps for global eradication. It’s about what leprosy can teach us. What you may not know is that leprosy is not a flesh eating disease. It…

Read More

Analyze This: A Runners Missing Link

Post By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT You’re a runner, and you’ve got pain. Not a little post workout soreness or the occasional ache, but pain that won’t go away. Or maybe it’s that annoying problem that keeps moving around – first it was the Achilles, then runner’s knee, IT band, plantar fasciitis… one injury improves just to make room for another.  And you’ve done it all. NSAIDs. Stretches. Injections. Massage. Foam Rolling. Exercises. Maybe you’ve even considered (or had) surgery. Yet the problem persists. Your friends, family, co-workers, and perhaps, even your medical professionals are telling you to hang up your running shoes. You’re starting to wonder if they’re right. BUT WAIT! (Says the physical therapist and like-minded “crazy” runner)….

Read More

The Athletic Hip Series: Piriformis Syndrome

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS To a runner, the word “Piriformis” is a dreaded, scary, and frustrating word. However, the diagnosis for Piriformis Syndrome is commonly overused and misdiagnosed. I would venture to say that in the years I have been working, I have never actually seen a true case of Pirifomis Syndrome. Many people assume that  hip tightness must be their ‘Piriformis.’ Well I am here to spread the word…that is just not true! Actual Piriformis Syndrome is when the piriformis muscle becomes so tight that it causes numbness, tingling and/or pain down into the respective leg. The piriformis muscle spans the backside of your hip, sits amongst your gluteal muscles, and runs from your tailbone to the outside of…

Read More

The Athletic Hip Series: Labral Tears

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS For all of you clinicians out there who participated in our journal club in June you were able to hear from one of Atlanta’s preeminent hip surgeons, Dr. Cliff Willimon. He addressed the assessment and treatment of hip pathologies primarily related to labral tears. So, it is only natural that I follow my last blog on hip impingement with a discussion on hip labral tears. For the layperson out there, you may be asking, “What is a labral tear and could I have this tear?” Well, the labrum of your hip is a cartilaginous ring that runs around the perimeter of your hip socket. This allows the ball to sit deeper in the…

Read More

Celebrations!

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS Exciting things are happening around Motion Stability and I would like to use my monthly blog to do things a bit differently and celebrate our happenings with you as part of our Motion Stability family! Many of you may recall SNOWMAGEDDON in Atlanta earlier this year, which left us all stranded in our homes… or on the side of the road… or a random stranger’s home or a hotel. For us as Motion Stability, we utilized our time home at the start of a new year to discuss many of our goals for the upcoming year as a group. One of our goals was to further develop our expertise as a clinic in…

Read More

What is Piriformis Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS If a patient comes in with posterior hip pain or radiating pain down their leg, a lot of times they have already self-diagnosed themselves with Piriformis Syndrome. However, Piriformis Syndrome is not as common as most people think. So, what actually is Piriformis Syndrome? Piriformis Syndrome is when the pirifomis muscle is irritated because it is being overutilized. This is usually secondary to weak lateral hip musculature i.e. your glutes… sensing a theme?? The piriformis muscle extends along the back and lateral side of your hip. When it is aggravated it can cause a deep achey sensation in sitting, walking, or running. Sometimes the muscle becomes tight from overuse and can compress the…

Read More

You’ve Got Some Nerve…

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People fall. People get hurt. Injuries usually get better… as we would hope. There are many cases, however, when common injuries that we think would get better over time do not. Here’s a case in which I have seen people have traumatic injuries such as slipping and falling on an outstretched arm, causing wrist and forearm pain. Most people, including physicians and physical therapists, would assume it’s a wrist injury such as a ligament sprain or fracture, and in most cases, it probably is. But let’s say the injured arm now presents with tingling, redness, or swelling. Now what do you think that may be coming from? One structure that is commonly…

Read More

The Athletic Hip Series: What is IT Band Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS IT, otherwise known as the Iliotibial Band, is a common source of lateral knee pain in runners. However, most people do not realize that this is an issue oftentimes stemming from the hip. Pain generated from disorders of the IT band can be present at its origination along the lateral pelvis all the way to the lateral knee. The IT band is usually over-utilized due to poor lower extremity mechanics. Weak hip musculature, primarily the glutes, cause increased reliance on the IT band to stabilize the knee. This scenario can cause the IT band to get caught in a “catch-22”: overuse of the IT band causes increased tightness of the TFL (Tensor Fascia…

Read More

Motion Stability