To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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The Injury Prevention Series

Post By: Adrianna Nebedum PT, DPT, OCS This past summer I had the pleasure of working as the physical therapist for Atlanta’s very own WNBA team, the Atlanta Dream.  It gave me an opportunity to see the athletes immediately after an injury. This is often very different from our traditional patient populations when therapists generally don’t see patients until several days or even weeks after injury.  It was an AWESOME experience, but the most resounding thing I took with me was the old adage by Benjamin Franklin, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Recently, there has been a rapid increase of sports injuries in athletes of all ages.   Since 2000, there has been a five-fold increase in serious…

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Are you Squatting Correctly? Part 3

By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT For the past two weeks, we’ve presented some common errors in squatting form and what you can do to make sure you’ve got great technique. In the final post in this series, we’ll take a look at the foot and ankle as well as the overall form you need to achieve a squat that really targets the glutes.   The Penguin As cute as our little feathered, tuxedo-wearing friends may be, you don’t want to find yourself emulating them in the gym. What I’m talking about is feet (one or both) that turn out to accommodate the squatting motion. Often, you will also notice that the arch at the inside of the foot collapses (lowers…

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Are you Squatting Correctly? Part 1

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Drop in to any gym, weight room, crossfit box, or bootcamp session and you’ll be guaranteed to find someone doing some form of squatting. Squatting is a great functional exercise – that means besides being a challenging movement, it has good carryover to the things we do in everyday life like work and sports. Unfortunately, I can also say that you can drop into most of those places and you are just as likely to find someone doing a squat incorrectly. Commonly they are not targeting the intended muscles or even worse stressing other areas of the body and increasing the risk for injury. Over the next few weeks, I’m going to highlight a…

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ACL Tears Growing

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT If you’re a football fan of any sense, whether it be college or NFL, it’s likely your hopes for your team have been sidetracked due to one of its players suffering from an ACL tear. And doesn’t it seem like they are happening more often now? Well this article by CNNSI shows that this year, ACL tears in the NFL are on the rise. The article stated, “We have counted 27 preseason ACL injuries, the highest tally since records were first kept in 2004.” Just as importantly, the article continues to say that “studies show 70 percent of ACL tears result from non-contact injuries.” This means there was no one else that…

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Life After ACL Reconstruction: Avoiding the Dreaded Re-Injury

Post by Laura Gold PT, DPT   ACL injuries are a common season-ending injury among athletes. Given the severity of the injury, many athletes opt for surgical repair of the damaged ligament in order to regain stability at the knee. While a number of athletes who undergo ACL reconstruction return to their sport, less than half of individuals make a full return to their activities following rehabilitation. According to one study looking specifically at high school and college athletes returning to sport following ACL reconstruction, only 50% reported they were able to perform at their pre-injury level. What’s more, somewhere between 6 and 30% of the post-reconstruction population experiences a second ACL injury. As a therapist involved in the rehabilitation…

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Motion Stability