To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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12 Things I Learned in my Year of Running

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As some of you may know my New Year’s resolution for 2014 was to run 1 race a month. I did not put any stipulations on it except that it had to be a sanctioned race aka  I had to pay for it and I got a shirt at the end of it.  The distance did not matter, but I did want to attempt getting to a half-marathon somewhere in the middle of all these races. The half-marathon was important to me because it was the race that has alluded me over the past couple of years due to a variety of injuries or unexpected life circumstances. In my mind, completing a half…

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Run Your Way to Better Walking

Post By: Laura Gold PT, DPT It’s possible that running and other high intensity exercise is beneficial in helping older adults keep that spring in their step. In a world where we often think that running might not be possible or advisable for older adults, I think that’s good news! A study (Here) published in November’s issue of PLOS One and summarized in today’s New York Times Health section  provides evidence that running may be beneficial for older adults in improving walking economy (i.e. how much energy it takes to walk at a given speed). The study looked at two groups of active older adults in their 60s and 70s; one group included regular walkers and the other included regular runners. The…

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Analyze This: A Runners Missing Link

Post By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT You’re a runner, and you’ve got pain. Not a little post workout soreness or the occasional ache, but pain that won’t go away. Or maybe it’s that annoying problem that keeps moving around – first it was the Achilles, then runner’s knee, IT band, plantar fasciitis… one injury improves just to make room for another.  And you’ve done it all. NSAIDs. Stretches. Injections. Massage. Foam Rolling. Exercises. Maybe you’ve even considered (or had) surgery. Yet the problem persists. Your friends, family, co-workers, and perhaps, even your medical professionals are telling you to hang up your running shoes. You’re starting to wonder if they’re right. BUT WAIT! (Says the physical therapist and like-minded “crazy” runner)….

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Mythbusters: Pt- Tie Down those Shoes

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS With less than 1 month before the big race, I have been struggling with shin splints on both legs. There are many factors that contribute to shin splints such as weakness in the core and hips, poor shoe wear, improper running form/stride length, etc. I wanted to start by trying to address something that could cause an immediate change. I know that my shoes were still in pretty good shape and still had plenty of miles left on them, so I took interest in some research involving proper fit of shoes with various lacing techniques. In the end, I discovered that shoe laces were part of the problem. That’s right, I changed the way…

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What are You Looking at?

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT If ever you are a new patient here at Motion Stability, you’ll likely be asked to walk and/or run in front of me. Have you ever wondered what I am looking at? Well to be honest, I’m looking at all the answers to your problem. Your walking form tells me plenty of answers as to how your body is working. Most, if not all injuries, will manifest itself into the walking form. If you have any strength, flexibility, or joint mobility issues, they will very likely show up in your walking form! The same holds true when I look at your running form on the treadmill. (To make it easier for…

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Step It Up! Increasing Running Cadence Can Really Take a Load Off (Your Joints!)

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Running related aches, pains, and injuries are often a result of repetitively overloading our joints and other tissues. One simple technique change that may reduce strain on the runner’s body is to increase your cadence. Have you ever watched elite distance runners glide around the track in the 10,000 meter or down the road in a big marathon? If so, you might have noticed how quickly they move their feet- their step rate, or “cadence” is typically at least 180 steps per minute. So how exactly does increasing cadence help prevent or treat injuries? In a study published in 2011 in the ACSM’s journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Heiderscheit and colleagues provide evidence that…

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How do foot related sports injuries affect the body?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT I pay particular attention to foot injuries and how it relates to the rest of the mechanics of the body. How the foot hits the ground affects how other joints in the body absorb shock as well as how the muscles around those joints work in sports performance. The most classic example that we see are patients that have a one sided knee, hip or back injury – say the right side. When we take our medical history the patient tells us they sprained their ankle on the same right side ‘way back in high school…but that got better’. But what the patient does not realize is that after the ankle was swollen from…

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Are Your Shoes Really Helping You?

Are Your Shoes Really Helping You?

Athletic shoewear have recently gained a lot of attention for their role in assisting a person to acheive a variety of health and fitness related goals. Skechers, being on of the first in the industry, have now come to the forefront of our attention again as some of their claims have been refutted.

Oftentimes we see patients who are flirting with shoes to solve an underlying biomechanical issue. In actuality the shoes are a “band-aid” and not solving the true physical issue at hand. Once the physical issues are resolved, the shoes become a means to assist instead of a failed solution. If you have questions regarding your shoewear and what it may or may not be doing for your health, please get in touch with one of the Motion Stability therapists!

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