To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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Mythbusters: Pt- Tie Down those Shoes

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS With less than 1 month before the big race, I have been struggling with shin splints on both legs. There are many factors that contribute to shin splints such as weakness in the core and hips, poor shoe wear, improper running form/stride length, etc. I wanted to start by trying to address something that could cause an immediate change. I know that my shoes were still in pretty good shape and still had plenty of miles left on them, so I took interest in some research involving proper fit of shoes with various lacing techniques. In the end, I discovered that shoe laces were part of the problem. That’s right, I changed the way…

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Motion Stability talks Football

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS With the baseball all-star break complete, No. 2 pencils in abundance on the shelves of stores everywhere, and crisp mornings in July complete with the smell of autumn, an avid sports fan, such as myself, cannot help but anticipate the arrival of football season! Year after year, hopes are set to the highest as pre-season hype takes over the radio, television, newspaper and social media. Our yearly mantra seems to be, “this is sure to be our year…. if we can keep everyone healthy.” Our ultimate downfall, year after year, seems to be injury after injury. Most recently in the world of college and professional football, ACL injuries seem to be in abundance…

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Learn About Jozy Altidore’s Hamstring Injury, the Motion Stability way.

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT Have you been watching the World Cup lately? Whether you’re into soccer or not, its hard to avoid all the World Cup news and updates. One of the recent updates is that Jozy Altidore, the US team’s premier striker alongside Clint Dempsey, will not be able to participate in tomorrow’s match versus Germany. This is the World Cup, the top competition for soccer worldwide, and so the conditions are no doubt intense. The weather’s heat and humidity has played a factor, as evident from the water break needed during US match versus Portugal this past Sunday. The level of competition and expectations from worldwide fans are also intense as well. With…

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Mythbusters: PT- Mommy Style

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The Myth: Running with a jogging stroller and baby is not that much different from running before pregnancy and should not be so difficult to perform. This is a common thought we have heard from our mommy patients over the years who often get frustrated with returning to their workouts after having a  baby. Specifically women, who may regularly run for exercise before or during pregnancy at an average of 15-20 miles per week, have difficulty returning to running even 1-2 miles at a time 6-12 months after having a baby. The proposed culprit to this obstacle: the jogging stroller. It would seem that simply pushing something on wheels would not so drastically…

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Balance Slow to Run Fast

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Have you ever taken the time to look at how you run? It’s an amazingly efficient combination of movements in the human body. If you take a closer look you’ll notice a few key elements: It’s a controlled fall. When both feet are in the air you are momentarily floating in air as your body prepares to land. When you land, it is not a giant disaster. You load and absorb your weight while also storing energy to bounce right back. Studies show that you absorb between 1.5 to 3 times your body weight upon impact, yet you hardly feel it! During your stance phase, when your foot is on the ground,…

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Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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Yoga and Hip Pain

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Here is a great read from the New York Times about hip pain that can occur during yoga. I need to first say that I do not think doing yoga is a bad thing, nor should people not do yoga. I find this article interesting because in our clinic we do find people getting injured in yoga, not necessarily because of the technique, but because people who are hyperflexible are unaware that increased stretching of an already “stretched out” joint or muscle may cause further stress and lead to injury. This could be females or males. This principle also pertains to any exercise regimen that people may involve themselves with, not just…

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Exercises To Prevent Lower Back Pain

What Exercises for My Core Can Help Prevent Lower Back Pain? Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT First – generally there are different roles of muscles in your trunk. Typically the smaller ones closest to your spine are considered ‘local’ muscles. Such muscles as the transversus abdominis, diaphragm, pelvic floor, and lumbar multifidus provide segmental control of your lumbar vertebra. Real-time ultrasound imaging can be used to visualize the proper contraction of these muscles as we cannot see these muscles from the superficial skin. So first step in core stability is to ensure that the smaller muscles are engaging properly. Then you have ‘global’ muscles which are the larger muscles – such as rectus abdominis, obliques, paraspinal muscles. These muscles…

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What Is The Right and Wrong Way to Bend Over?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Proper bending requires a fluid ‘lumbopelvic rhythm’. This means the hips and spine should coordinate to be able to touch the ground. Ideally there should be a 2:1 ratio hip movement to spine movement.  What we see typically in the clinic is that patients have significant restriction of what we call ‘hip hinging’ as the patients hips have restricted motion, thus requiring increased movement from the spine..with repetitive and excessive movement at the spine it creates greater torque to the spine. The other scenario we commonly see are patients who have fear to move their spine and essentially ‘lock’ their spines in slight hyper-extension and try to bend entirely from their hips. This creates…

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