To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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Swimmer’s Shoulder

by Deanna Camilo PT, DPT, OCS  Faculty Practice / Clinical Education Director   Whether you’re a competitive swimmer, triathlete, or swim just for fun/fitness, if you’ve spent any significant amount of time in the pool you’ve likely experienced at least one episode of shoulder pain.  As a swammer (that’s a former swimmer for those of you who are new to swimming lingo), I experienced my first episode of shoulder pain at age 10 and had shoulder surgery when I was 13.  When I look back on this experience, through the eyes of a physical therapist, I truly believe that the surgery could have been prevented if I had received a comprehensive analysis of my movement mechanics rather than everyone simply…

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The Athletic Hip Series: The Various Hamstring Injuries

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy Anyone who has had, or knows someone who has had, a hamstring tear knows it can look pretty bad. Typically people will report pain, hearing a pop, and a deep, ugly bruise that shows up a couple of days later that can extend past the knee. Even though this sounds really dramatic those are the kinds of injuries you actually want to have, because after the initial inflammation they tend to heal fairly quickly. Then there are the more common and much less talked about tendiopathies. These are the injuries that come on slowly and you do not notice until it’s almost too late. They are…

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Understanding Chronic Pain: It’s All In Your Head

By: Deanna Camilo, PT, DPT The first thing we need to know in order to begin our understanding of pain is that pain is a product of the brain’s interpretation of two things: An unpleasant sensation. The circumstances surrounding the introduction of the unpleasant sensation. All sensory information (touch, vision, taste, etc.) must be evaluated by the nervous system, and accurate interpretation of this information depends on the context surrounding the introduction of the sensation.  Pain does not become pain until the brain interprets the sensation as dangerous or threatening. “Dangerous or threatening” is determined by contextual clues provided by the rest of the body: emotions, previous memories, and potential consequences of each response. Thus, the amount of pain you…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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12 Things I Learned in my Year of Running

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As some of you may know my New Year’s resolution for 2014 was to run 1 race a month. I did not put any stipulations on it except that it had to be a sanctioned race aka  I had to pay for it and I got a shirt at the end of it.  The distance did not matter, but I did want to attempt getting to a half-marathon somewhere in the middle of all these races. The half-marathon was important to me because it was the race that has alluded me over the past couple of years due to a variety of injuries or unexpected life circumstances. In my mind, completing a half…

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Run Your Way to Better Walking

Post By: Laura Gold PT, DPT It’s possible that running and other high intensity exercise is beneficial in helping older adults keep that spring in their step. In a world where we often think that running might not be possible or advisable for older adults, I think that’s good news! A study (Here) published in November’s issue of PLOS One and summarized in today’s New York Times Health section  provides evidence that running may be beneficial for older adults in improving walking economy (i.e. how much energy it takes to walk at a given speed). The study looked at two groups of active older adults in their 60s and 70s; one group included regular walkers and the other included regular runners. The…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Ischiofemoral Impingement and Tendinopathies

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS In the clinic, therapists tend to see injuries happen in waves. One month its shoulders and the next it’s a completely different body part. Recently, I have had a rash of patients coming in with the diagnosis of ischiofemoral impingement. As the time for my monthly blog approached, I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to delve into this diagnosis a little bit more. What is it you ask? Ischiofemoral impingement is the result of contact between the lesser trochanter of the femur and the ischium (or lower part of the pelvis.) Patients usually report buttocks or groin pain and this can often mimic symptoms of a hip flexor or hamstring tendinopathy….

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The Value of Pain: Leprosy

Post by: Laura Gold, PT, DPT Leprosy. We’ve almost all heard of it and many of us, at a very early age. It is a common topic in biblical stories and a horrible disease of “biblical” proportions. Leprosy is not nearly as ubiquitous and devastating as it once was — it is far less common, and we have much better means of treating it. Unfortunately, it is still a problem in poorer areas of the world in which people don’t have access to healthcare. But this post isn’t about the epidemiology of leprosy and steps for global eradication. It’s about what leprosy can teach us. What you may not know is that leprosy is not a flesh eating disease. It…

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Innovative Leaders

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As you may have read from Beth’s previous blog October is National Physical Therapy month which means it’s a pretty busy month at our clinic. I can say from personal experience that it has been quite a whirlwind! This is the month that our national organization (APTA) has designated to advocate for the profession and really tell the world what we do and how Physical Therapy can play an important role in your life. That being said, there are a lot of events that all occur within this month’s short 31 days. The slogan for national PT month is “Move Forward” www.moveforwardpt.com. That can mean many things, but here at Motion Stability we have taken that…

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