To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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Run Your Way to Better Walking

Post By: Laura Gold PT, DPT It’s possible that running and other high intensity exercise is beneficial in helping older adults keep that spring in their step. In a world where we often think that running might not be possible or advisable for older adults, I think that’s good news! A study (Here) published in November’s issue of PLOS One and summarized in today’s New York Times Health section  provides evidence that running may be beneficial for older adults in improving walking economy (i.e. how much energy it takes to walk at a given speed). The study looked at two groups of active older adults in their 60s and 70s; one group included regular walkers and the other included regular runners. The…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Piriformis Syndrome

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS To a runner, the word “Piriformis” is a dreaded, scary, and frustrating word. However, the diagnosis for Piriformis Syndrome is commonly overused and misdiagnosed. I would venture to say that in the years I have been working, I have never actually seen a true case of Pirifomis Syndrome. Many people assume that  hip tightness must be their ‘Piriformis.’ Well I am here to spread the word…that is just not true! Actual Piriformis Syndrome is when the piriformis muscle becomes so tight that it causes numbness, tingling and/or pain down into the respective leg. The piriformis muscle spans the backside of your hip, sits amongst your gluteal muscles, and runs from your tailbone to the outside of…

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Exercise Prescription

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT As a physical therapist, I love giving my patients home exercises. Like a physician prescribing medications, I too take great care in prescribing exercises for my patients to perform at home. You’ll likely do plenty of exercises during a physical therapy visit, but the exercises performed at home are the most important in any treatment plan. Ever wonder how your home exercises work? Here are the top 5 characteristics for your home exercises 1. Home exercises will address the most important issue of your condition If your physical therapist gives you an exercise to perform at home, it’s a really important to do them. This is because your physical therapist has…

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Tiger. Back Pain. Golf. Responsibility.

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Dr. Kharim Khan composed a blog on his response to Tiger Woods’ recent back pain episodes. He gives an explanation of the diagnosis and a discussion about health practitioners responsibility of educating patients on proper evidence based information. I could not write my thoughts better than his, so please read his blog. I would love to hear feedback both from patient’s perspectives as well as health practitioners. Click HERE for the blog. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your…

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Motion Stability talks Football

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS With the baseball all-star break complete, No. 2 pencils in abundance on the shelves of stores everywhere, and crisp mornings in July complete with the smell of autumn, an avid sports fan, such as myself, cannot help but anticipate the arrival of football season! Year after year, hopes are set to the highest as pre-season hype takes over the radio, television, newspaper and social media. Our yearly mantra seems to be, “this is sure to be our year…. if we can keep everyone healthy.” Our ultimate downfall, year after year, seems to be injury after injury. Most recently in the world of college and professional football, ACL injuries seem to be in abundance…

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What are You Looking at?

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT If ever you are a new patient here at Motion Stability, you’ll likely be asked to walk and/or run in front of me. Have you ever wondered what I am looking at? Well to be honest, I’m looking at all the answers to your problem. Your walking form tells me plenty of answers as to how your body is working. Most, if not all injuries, will manifest itself into the walking form. If you have any strength, flexibility, or joint mobility issues, they will very likely show up in your walking form! The same holds true when I look at your running form on the treadmill. (To make it easier for…

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Summer Swim Team! Which Stroke is the Best for my Child?

Post by Brian Yee, PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT As summer break kicks off, summer camps, travel teams, and most notably- swim teams go into full force! Every day practices, weekend meets, hours in the water and sun… oh what fun! But have you wondered why your child may excel in one stroke such as breast stroke but not in freestyle? Or why he or she is a good all around swimmer in medley events but simply does not have the power to excel in any of them? There are many reasons why a child excels in a stroke or event, and on the flip side is likely to get injured. This could be pure coordination, athleticism, determination, and body development in…

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Mythbusters: PT- Mommy Style

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The Myth: Running with a jogging stroller and baby is not that much different from running before pregnancy and should not be so difficult to perform. This is a common thought we have heard from our mommy patients over the years who often get frustrated with returning to their workouts after having a  baby. Specifically women, who may regularly run for exercise before or during pregnancy at an average of 15-20 miles per week, have difficulty returning to running even 1-2 miles at a time 6-12 months after having a baby. The proposed culprit to this obstacle: the jogging stroller. It would seem that simply pushing something on wheels would not so drastically…

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Balance Slow to Run Fast

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Have you ever taken the time to look at how you run? It’s an amazingly efficient combination of movements in the human body. If you take a closer look you’ll notice a few key elements: It’s a controlled fall. When both feet are in the air you are momentarily floating in air as your body prepares to land. When you land, it is not a giant disaster. You load and absorb your weight while also storing energy to bounce right back. Studies show that you absorb between 1.5 to 3 times your body weight upon impact, yet you hardly feel it! During your stance phase, when your foot is on the ground,…

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