Eating Disorders, RED-S and Physical Therapy

 

Eating Disorders, RED-S and Physical Therapy

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT* Many people are familiar with eating disorders and disordered eating, but there is a significant amount of myth, misinformation and stigma surrounding these topics. There are 8-10 million Americans struggling with eating disorders. This statistic includes diagnoses of anorexia, bulimia, compulsive over-eating, and non-specific eating disorders that do not squarely fit into another category. A true eating disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis and may be accompanied by other psychiatric diagnoses, including depression, anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Anorexia has a 12x higher mortality rate for girls 15-24 years of age than all other causes of death. Eating disorders are often overlooked and missed by parents, friends, coaches, teachers, and healthcare professionals. Therefore, it…

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The Athletic Hip Series: The Various Hamstring Injuries

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy Anyone who has had, or knows someone who has had, a hamstring tear knows it can look pretty bad. Typically people will report pain, hearing a pop, and a deep, ugly bruise that shows up a couple of days later that can extend past the knee. Even though this sounds really dramatic those are the kinds of injuries you actually want to have, because after the initial inflammation they tend to heal fairly quickly. Then there are the more common and much less talked about tendiopathies. These are the injuries that come on slowly and you do not notice until it’s almost too late. They are…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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12 Things I Learned in my Year of Running

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As some of you may know my New Year’s resolution for 2014 was to run 1 race a month. I did not put any stipulations on it except that it had to be a sanctioned race aka  I had to pay for it and I got a shirt at the end of it.  The distance did not matter, but I did want to attempt getting to a half-marathon somewhere in the middle of all these races. The half-marathon was important to me because it was the race that has alluded me over the past couple of years due to a variety of injuries or unexpected life circumstances. In my mind, completing a half…

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Tis’ The Stressful Season!

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT How many of you feel this underlying tension or anxiety during this time of season? So when you say to someone Happy Holidays!!! – with a sense of cheer, peace and joy there’s also this funny vibe in you that says “ohhhh man…ever since Thanksgiving I am so stressed because I have end of the year things to take care of at work, at home, my kids’ school, getting ready for family coming over, buying gifts, dealing with traffic..and now I or my loved one has a winter cold. All at the same time! Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!”Perhaps you do not think that at all..and that’s simply just me.Even if it is just me, I…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Ischiofemoral Impingement and Tendinopathies

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS In the clinic, therapists tend to see injuries happen in waves. One month its shoulders and the next it’s a completely different body part. Recently, I have had a rash of patients coming in with the diagnosis of ischiofemoral impingement. As the time for my monthly blog approached, I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to delve into this diagnosis a little bit more. What is it you ask? Ischiofemoral impingement is the result of contact between the lesser trochanter of the femur and the ischium (or lower part of the pelvis.) Patients usually report buttocks or groin pain and this can often mimic symptoms of a hip flexor or hamstring tendinopathy….

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Keep on Your Toes

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Let’s keep you on your toes this season! Having treated dancers in the Atlanta area for 9 years, the holiday season always arrives with a bit of hope and apprehension.  My ballerinas are preparing for the Nutcracker.  My Irish step dancers are preparing for Southeastern Regional Oireachtas in Orlando. Even my adult, recreational dancers are in performance mode with upcoming events at Dance 101.  Whether you are a Snowflake or the Sugar Plum Fairy, you need to be at your best.  As much as I love treating dancers of all ages and styles, I would much rather be busy watching you all dance than treating you. So, how can we all stay…

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The Value of Pain: Leprosy

Post by: Laura Gold, PT, DPT Leprosy. We’ve almost all heard of it and many of us, at a very early age. It is a common topic in biblical stories and a horrible disease of “biblical” proportions. Leprosy is not nearly as ubiquitous and devastating as it once was — it is far less common, and we have much better means of treating it. Unfortunately, it is still a problem in poorer areas of the world in which people don’t have access to healthcare. But this post isn’t about the epidemiology of leprosy and steps for global eradication. It’s about what leprosy can teach us. What you may not know is that leprosy is not a flesh eating disease. It…

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Innovative Leaders

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As you may have read from Beth’s previous blog October is National Physical Therapy month which means it’s a pretty busy month at our clinic. I can say from personal experience that it has been quite a whirlwind! This is the month that our national organization (APTA) has designated to advocate for the profession and really tell the world what we do and how Physical Therapy can play an important role in your life. That being said, there are a lot of events that all occur within this month’s short 31 days. The slogan for national PT month is “Move Forward” www.moveforwardpt.com. That can mean many things, but here at Motion Stability we have taken that…

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October is National Physical Therapy Month

Post By: Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS October is National Physical Therapy Month! We have celebrated this month with reflection for gratitude to be a part of such an amazing profession that is ever growing and changing. We are able to have invaluable relationships with our patients who trust us to aid them during some of their most vulnerable times, and the ability to constantly push ourselves and our colleagues by initiating research to find answers to the unknown. At Motion Stability, we take pride in doing things a bit “outside of the box” in an effort to provide the highest quality of care possible. Although our practice theories may be a bit different from other PT practices in the…

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