National Physical Therapy Month: Pt 1

 

National Physical Therapy Month: Pt 1

October is finally here! The weather is beginning to get a little cooler, pumpkin spice things are everywhere, the arguments over who loves/hates candy corn have started, and National Physical Therapy Month is upon us! The APTA started this celebration of physical therapists and our profession in 1992 and has continued to promote and encourage this wonderful profession for the past 25 years!     Each year there is a theme to National Physical Therapy Month and the theme for 2017 follows the APTA Move Forward campaign #ChoosePT. The APTA is encouraging the community to #ChoosePT as a safer alternative to opioids for the treatment of non-cancer related pain.  Opioids have become a “go-to” medication for patients with pain, but…

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Understanding Chronic Pain: It’s All In Your Head

By: Deanna Camilo, PT, DPT The first thing we need to know in order to begin our understanding of pain is that pain is a product of the brain’s interpretation of two things: An unpleasant sensation. The circumstances surrounding the introduction of the unpleasant sensation. All sensory information (touch, vision, taste, etc.) must be evaluated by the nervous system, and accurate interpretation of this information depends on the context surrounding the introduction of the sensation.  Pain does not become pain until the brain interprets the sensation as dangerous or threatening. “Dangerous or threatening” is determined by contextual clues provided by the rest of the body: emotions, previous memories, and potential consequences of each response. Thus, the amount of pain you…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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Tis’ The Stressful Season!

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT How many of you feel this underlying tension or anxiety during this time of season? So when you say to someone Happy Holidays!!! – with a sense of cheer, peace and joy there’s also this funny vibe in you that says “ohhhh man…ever since Thanksgiving I am so stressed because I have end of the year things to take care of at work, at home, my kids’ school, getting ready for family coming over, buying gifts, dealing with traffic..and now I or my loved one has a winter cold. All at the same time! Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!”Perhaps you do not think that at all..and that’s simply just me.Even if it is just me, I…

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What is Piriformis Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS If a patient comes in with posterior hip pain or radiating pain down their leg, a lot of times they have already self-diagnosed themselves with Piriformis Syndrome. However, Piriformis Syndrome is not as common as most people think. So, what actually is Piriformis Syndrome? Piriformis Syndrome is when the pirifomis muscle is irritated because it is being overutilized. This is usually secondary to weak lateral hip musculature i.e. your glutes… sensing a theme?? The piriformis muscle extends along the back and lateral side of your hip. When it is aggravated it can cause a deep achey sensation in sitting, walking, or running. Sometimes the muscle becomes tight from overuse and can compress the…

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You’ve Got Some Nerve…

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People fall. People get hurt. Injuries usually get better… as we would hope. There are many cases, however, when common injuries that we think would get better over time do not. Here’s a case in which I have seen people have traumatic injuries such as slipping and falling on an outstretched arm, causing wrist and forearm pain. Most people, including physicians and physical therapists, would assume it’s a wrist injury such as a ligament sprain or fracture, and in most cases, it probably is. But let’s say the injured arm now presents with tingling, redness, or swelling. Now what do you think that may be coming from? One structure that is commonly…

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My Numbness and Tingling Continue, but My Testing Does Not Show Anything!

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Many times we get patients in our clinic who experience ongoing or unresolved nerve symptoms. This can include things such as tingling, numbness, a pinched nerve in the neck, herniated disc, or burning pain that they know is coming from a nerve condition, such as sciatica. The patient may go through exhaustive testing by MRI, which rules out significant involvement from a herniated disc. Or they could participate in an EMG or Nerve Conduction Study which shows the nerve is conducting fine. And yet, the patient still has nerve-like symptoms. This results in the health practitioner sending the patient to physical therapy to try something like traction, whick does not help long term…

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Is Back Pain All in Your Head?

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT What a great article from NPR! This article identifies that recurring back problems are not solely from the structure in your spine such as a herniated disc or degeneration or the vertebra, but rather it brings attention to the nervous system itself. Your nervous system, located within your spine, is your main transducer that signals to your brain that you are or are not in pain. This article states: “Research is showing that the pain often has nothing to do with the mechanics of the spine, but with the way the nervous system is behaving, according to Dr. James Rainville of New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.” “This is a different way…

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Runner’s High for Chronic Pain?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS October and November have been exciting months, especially for our runners… you know who you are! I want to congratulate all of you on achieving a goal that you might have even embarked on over a year ago. Your hard work, sweat, aches, and pains have paid off and we are enjoying hearing the results pouring in from the finish lines of New York, D.C., Atlanta, and many more! I personally feel so privileged to have been able to help you take those final steps across the finish line, so thank you! No matter what distance your run (or whatever endurance sport you participate in), you know that crossing that finish line is…

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The Mystery of Chronic Pain

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS At Motion Stability we understand that many people experience pain despite allowing time for body tissues to heal, taking medications or even having surgery. Other times, there may be no direct mechanism of injury, but a person may notice that the weight of clothing or air blowing on their skin may become painful. In these cases, a person’s complaints cannot be treated the same as a typical injury. It is important to seek out healthcare providers who understand the science behind the many pain mechanisms. In this TED Talk, Elliot Krane explains how such pain complaints can occur in the body. Please contact the therapists at Motion Stability if any of these symptoms…

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