Sports

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

Read More

Swimmer’s Shoulder

by Deanna Camilo PT, DPT, OCS  Faculty Practice / Clinical Education Director   Whether you’re a competitive swimmer, triathlete, or swim just for fun/fitness, if you’ve spent any significant amount of time in the pool you’ve likely experienced at least one episode of shoulder pain.  As a swammer (that’s a former swimmer for those of you who are new to swimming lingo), I experienced my first episode of shoulder pain at age 10 and had shoulder surgery when I was 13.  When I look back on this experience, through the eyes of a physical therapist, I truly believe that the surgery could have been prevented if I had received a comprehensive analysis of my movement mechanics rather than everyone simply…

Read More

October is National Physical Therapy Month

Post By: Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS October is National Physical Therapy Month! We have celebrated this month with reflection for gratitude to be a part of such an amazing profession that is ever growing and changing. We are able to have invaluable relationships with our patients who trust us to aid them during some of their most vulnerable times, and the ability to constantly push ourselves and our colleagues by initiating research to find answers to the unknown. At Motion Stability, we take pride in doing things a bit “outside of the box” in an effort to provide the highest quality of care possible. Although our practice theories may be a bit different from other PT practices in the…

Read More

Analyze This: A Runners Missing Link

Post By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT You’re a runner, and you’ve got pain. Not a little post workout soreness or the occasional ache, but pain that won’t go away. Or maybe it’s that annoying problem that keeps moving around – first it was the Achilles, then runner’s knee, IT band, plantar fasciitis… one injury improves just to make room for another.  And you’ve done it all. NSAIDs. Stretches. Injections. Massage. Foam Rolling. Exercises. Maybe you’ve even considered (or had) surgery. Yet the problem persists. Your friends, family, co-workers, and perhaps, even your medical professionals are telling you to hang up your running shoes. You’re starting to wonder if they’re right. BUT WAIT! (Says the physical therapist and like-minded “crazy” runner)….

Read More

Mythbusters: Pt- Tie Down those Shoes

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS With less than 1 month before the big race, I have been struggling with shin splints on both legs. There are many factors that contribute to shin splints such as weakness in the core and hips, poor shoe wear, improper running form/stride length, etc. I wanted to start by trying to address something that could cause an immediate change. I know that my shoes were still in pretty good shape and still had plenty of miles left on them, so I took interest in some research involving proper fit of shoes with various lacing techniques. In the end, I discovered that shoe laces were part of the problem. That’s right, I changed the way…

Read More

Exercise Prescription

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT As a physical therapist, I love giving my patients home exercises. Like a physician prescribing medications, I too take great care in prescribing exercises for my patients to perform at home. You’ll likely do plenty of exercises during a physical therapy visit, but the exercises performed at home are the most important in any treatment plan. Ever wonder how your home exercises work? Here are the top 5 characteristics for your home exercises 1. Home exercises will address the most important issue of your condition If your physical therapist gives you an exercise to perform at home, it’s a really important to do them. This is because your physical therapist has…

Read More

Tiger. Back Pain. Golf. Responsibility.

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Dr. Kharim Khan composed a blog on his response to Tiger Woods’ recent back pain episodes. He gives an explanation of the diagnosis and a discussion about health practitioners responsibility of educating patients on proper evidence based information. I could not write my thoughts better than his, so please read his blog. I would love to hear feedback both from patient’s perspectives as well as health practitioners. Click HERE for the blog. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your…

Read More

Summer Swim Team! Which Stroke is the Best for my Child?

Post by Brian Yee, PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT As summer break kicks off, summer camps, travel teams, and most notably- swim teams go into full force! Every day practices, weekend meets, hours in the water and sun… oh what fun! But have you wondered why your child may excel in one stroke such as breast stroke but not in freestyle? Or why he or she is a good all around swimmer in medley events but simply does not have the power to excel in any of them? There are many reasons why a child excels in a stroke or event, and on the flip side is likely to get injured. This could be pure coordination, athleticism, determination, and body development in…

Read More

Mythbusters: PT- Mommy Style

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The Myth: Running with a jogging stroller and baby is not that much different from running before pregnancy and should not be so difficult to perform. This is a common thought we have heard from our mommy patients over the years who often get frustrated with returning to their workouts after having a  baby. Specifically women, who may regularly run for exercise before or during pregnancy at an average of 15-20 miles per week, have difficulty returning to running even 1-2 miles at a time 6-12 months after having a baby. The proposed culprit to this obstacle: the jogging stroller. It would seem that simply pushing something on wheels would not so drastically…

Read More

Balance Slow to Run Fast

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Have you ever taken the time to look at how you run? It’s an amazingly efficient combination of movements in the human body. If you take a closer look you’ll notice a few key elements: It’s a controlled fall. When both feet are in the air you are momentarily floating in air as your body prepares to land. When you land, it is not a giant disaster. You load and absorb your weight while also storing energy to bounce right back. Studies show that you absorb between 1.5 to 3 times your body weight upon impact, yet you hardly feel it! During your stance phase, when your foot is on the ground,…

Read More

Motion Stability