Sport

 

Swimmer’s Shoulder

by Deanna Camilo PT, DPT, OCS  Faculty Practice / Clinical Education Director   Whether you’re a competitive swimmer, triathlete, or swim just for fun/fitness, if you’ve spent any significant amount of time in the pool you’ve likely experienced at least one episode of shoulder pain.  As a swammer (that’s a former swimmer for those of you who are new to swimming lingo), I experienced my first episode of shoulder pain at age 10 and had shoulder surgery when I was 13.  When I look back on this experience, through the eyes of a physical therapist, I truly believe that the surgery could have been prevented if I had received a comprehensive analysis of my movement mechanics rather than everyone simply…

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These Feet Were Made for Walking

By: Clarence Holmes, PT, DPT “OUCH!!!!! I just got done playing tennis and my foot is killing me!” “Man, when I stand at work for more than 20 minutes, my foot really starts to hurt.” “Every time I take a step in the morning, my foot is in so much pain! It eventually gets better, but I don’t know what is going on.  I’ve got to go see my doctor.”   Or do you?  If you have said any of the above, then you definitely want to tune in to this blog post!   Foot pain can be the result of various causes and often times, it is the result of plantar fasciitis.  But do you know what that is? …

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So you Wanna Stretch your Hamstrings

By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT One of the most popular areas that people like to stretch is their hamstrings. Even with my patients who don’t stretch regularly, it’s the one of the first  places people go. It makes sense too — hamstrings are often tight or feel tight. AND there are lots of ways to stretch them.  Sitting in a chair, sitting on the ground, bending over and touching the toes, lying on your back with a stretch strap, etc, etc. The problem is that many of these stretches DON’T actually target the hamstring muscles… GASP! (Okay, so maybe it’s not that dramatic.) Often when people attempt to stretch their hamstrings they actually put tension on the sciatic nerve instead….

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Are you Squatting Correctly? Part 3

By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT For the past two weeks, we’ve presented some common errors in squatting form and what you can do to make sure you’ve got great technique. In the final post in this series, we’ll take a look at the foot and ankle as well as the overall form you need to achieve a squat that really targets the glutes.   The Penguin As cute as our little feathered, tuxedo-wearing friends may be, you don’t want to find yourself emulating them in the gym. What I’m talking about is feet (one or both) that turn out to accommodate the squatting motion. Often, you will also notice that the arch at the inside of the foot collapses (lowers…

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Are You Squatting Correctly? Part 2

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Last week we introduced the idea that errors in squatting form are very common and can usually be fixed. We looked at a couple of common problems with trunk and lumbar spine posture and gave you some hints for healthier back (and stronger core!) when squatting. This week we’re talking about knees! The Knee Diver If you have this little hiccup in your squat, you might also be experiencing some knee pain! With this movement pattern, the knees creep forward over and past the toes as the squatter gets lower to the floor. This style of squat puts lots of pressure on your knees – especially at the knee cap. Luckily, it is a…

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Are you Squatting Correctly? Part 1

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Drop in to any gym, weight room, crossfit box, or bootcamp session and you’ll be guaranteed to find someone doing some form of squatting. Squatting is a great functional exercise – that means besides being a challenging movement, it has good carryover to the things we do in everyday life like work and sports. Unfortunately, I can also say that you can drop into most of those places and you are just as likely to find someone doing a squat incorrectly. Commonly they are not targeting the intended muscles or even worse stressing other areas of the body and increasing the risk for injury. Over the next few weeks, I’m going to highlight a…

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ACL Tears Growing

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT If you’re a football fan of any sense, whether it be college or NFL, it’s likely your hopes for your team have been sidetracked due to one of its players suffering from an ACL tear. And doesn’t it seem like they are happening more often now? Well this article by CNNSI shows that this year, ACL tears in the NFL are on the rise. The article stated, “We have counted 27 preseason ACL injuries, the highest tally since records were first kept in 2004.” Just as importantly, the article continues to say that “studies show 70 percent of ACL tears result from non-contact injuries.” This means there was no one else that…

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Life After ACL Reconstruction: Avoiding the Dreaded Re-Injury

Post by Laura Gold PT, DPT   ACL injuries are a common season-ending injury among athletes. Given the severity of the injury, many athletes opt for surgical repair of the damaged ligament in order to regain stability at the knee. While a number of athletes who undergo ACL reconstruction return to their sport, less than half of individuals make a full return to their activities following rehabilitation. According to one study looking specifically at high school and college athletes returning to sport following ACL reconstruction, only 50% reported they were able to perform at their pre-injury level. What’s more, somewhere between 6 and 30% of the post-reconstruction population experiences a second ACL injury. As a therapist involved in the rehabilitation…

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Pregnant and Running?

Whether you are a mom-to-be or a new mom, your body experiences changes that can affect your running biomechanics. In this podcast, physical therapists Bryan Heidersheit, PT, PhD, and Liz Chumanov, PT, DPT from the University of Wisconsin, discuss findings from their study investigating this topic, as well as, their clinical experiences with pregnant and postpartum runners. http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Radio/Detail.aspx?cid=d56f90c7-19dd-4689-9776-8fb6238a453a New aches and pains slowing you down? Trying to get back to running following pregnancy? We can help. The physical therapists at Movement Sports can help.   Call us today to set up a consultation.

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Movement: A Priority for the Older Adult

While it is important for people to be physically active at all ages, movement of our bodies on  a regular basis becomes even more critical as we age. Regular physical activity can prevent, slow, or even reverse many of the disease processes common among older adults. It is also important to remember that while some changes in our tissues are normal with age, we can most effectively keep muscles, bones, and joints healthy by using them; in other words, movement and exercise are the closest things we have to a fountain of youth. When it comes to making choices about staying active for you or an older adult member of your family, consider these facts:   Regular physical activity is…

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Motion Stability