Runners

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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What are You Looking at?

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT If ever you are a new patient here at Motion Stability, you’ll likely be asked to walk and/or run in front of me. Have you ever wondered what I am looking at? Well to be honest, I’m looking at all the answers to your problem. Your walking form tells me plenty of answers as to how your body is working. Most, if not all injuries, will manifest itself into the walking form. If you have any strength, flexibility, or joint mobility issues, they will very likely show up in your walking form! The same holds true when I look at your running form on the treadmill. (To make it easier for…

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Mythbusters: PT- Mommy Style

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The Myth: Running with a jogging stroller and baby is not that much different from running before pregnancy and should not be so difficult to perform. This is a common thought we have heard from our mommy patients over the years who often get frustrated with returning to their workouts after having a  baby. Specifically women, who may regularly run for exercise before or during pregnancy at an average of 15-20 miles per week, have difficulty returning to running even 1-2 miles at a time 6-12 months after having a baby. The proposed culprit to this obstacle: the jogging stroller. It would seem that simply pushing something on wheels would not so drastically…

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Balance Slow to Run Fast

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Have you ever taken the time to look at how you run? It’s an amazingly efficient combination of movements in the human body. If you take a closer look you’ll notice a few key elements: It’s a controlled fall. When both feet are in the air you are momentarily floating in air as your body prepares to land. When you land, it is not a giant disaster. You load and absorb your weight while also storing energy to bounce right back. Studies show that you absorb between 1.5 to 3 times your body weight upon impact, yet you hardly feel it! During your stance phase, when your foot is on the ground,…

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Runner’s High for Chronic Pain?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS October and November have been exciting months, especially for our runners… you know who you are! I want to congratulate all of you on achieving a goal that you might have even embarked on over a year ago. Your hard work, sweat, aches, and pains have paid off and we are enjoying hearing the results pouring in from the finish lines of New York, D.C., Atlanta, and many more! I personally feel so privileged to have been able to help you take those final steps across the finish line, so thank you! No matter what distance your run (or whatever endurance sport you participate in), you know that crossing that finish line is…

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What do the callouses on my feet say about my sports injury?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Even by looking at someone’s callouses on their feet we can begin to make an assessment why and where the patient is injured somewhere higher in the body. For example, runners that have an excess of callousing along the entire ball of the foot tells us that they are putting an excessive amount of force their. Like pressing on a gas pedal, we can deduct that the athlete is using alot of their calf muscles to generate movement and power. It is possible to make assumptions that calf cramps, achilles tendinitis and shin splints occur due to the increased stresses at the ball of the foot. Another example are bunions along the first toe….

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Do Your Knees Hurt After Jogging?

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT It is common for joggers to have knee pain. It is usually due to a combination of improper strength and flexibility not only at the knee, but also the hip and foot. The hip is designed to absorb a majority of shock, as well as produce power through the gluteal muscles. The foot contacts the ground and provides proper ground reaction forces up the kinetic chain. If the hip or foot do not work correctly, the knee undergoes increased stress. Like a paper clip bending repetitively, injuries at the knee can then occur. In runners, pain can present itself in the front (i.e. patellar pain), outside (i.e. iliotibial band syndrome), or along the…

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Are Your Shoes Really Helping You?

Are Your Shoes Really Helping You?

Athletic shoewear have recently gained a lot of attention for their role in assisting a person to acheive a variety of health and fitness related goals. Skechers, being on of the first in the industry, have now come to the forefront of our attention again as some of their claims have been refutted.

Oftentimes we see patients who are flirting with shoes to solve an underlying biomechanical issue. In actuality the shoes are a “band-aid” and not solving the true physical issue at hand. Once the physical issues are resolved, the shoes become a means to assist instead of a failed solution. If you have questions regarding your shoewear and what it may or may not be doing for your health, please get in touch with one of the Motion Stability therapists!

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Lazy Butt Syndrome

As the height of running season approaches, it is prudent to address the importance of the hip musculature in keeping a runner pain-free while maintaining the efficiency required for long distance events. Motion Stability has partnered with Phiddipides, a local running store, to discuss this topic with their runners. A lack of hip muscle strength can cause a myriad of problems in any person, but is especially problematic for runners as the hip muscles not only provide the propulsion for a powerful stride, but also the pelvic stability required to keep the lower legs moving efficiently. For a closer look at how weak hips can literally be a “pain in the butt” for runners, please click here read the article posted…

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