Pain Sciences

 

Understanding Chronic Pain: It’s All In Your Head

By: Deanna Camilo, PT, DPT The first thing we need to know in order to begin our understanding of pain is that pain is a product of the brain’s interpretation of two things: An unpleasant sensation. The circumstances surrounding the introduction of the unpleasant sensation. All sensory information (touch, vision, taste, etc.) must be evaluated by the nervous system, and accurate interpretation of this information depends on the context surrounding the introduction of the sensation.  Pain does not become pain until the brain interprets the sensation as dangerous or threatening. “Dangerous or threatening” is determined by contextual clues provided by the rest of the body: emotions, previous memories, and potential consequences of each response. Thus, the amount of pain you…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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Tis’ The Stressful Season!

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT How many of you feel this underlying tension or anxiety during this time of season? So when you say to someone Happy Holidays!!! – with a sense of cheer, peace and joy there’s also this funny vibe in you that says “ohhhh man…ever since Thanksgiving I am so stressed because I have end of the year things to take care of at work, at home, my kids’ school, getting ready for family coming over, buying gifts, dealing with traffic..and now I or my loved one has a winter cold. All at the same time! Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!”Perhaps you do not think that at all..and that’s simply just me.Even if it is just me, I…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Ischiofemoral Impingement and Tendinopathies

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS In the clinic, therapists tend to see injuries happen in waves. One month its shoulders and the next it’s a completely different body part. Recently, I have had a rash of patients coming in with the diagnosis of ischiofemoral impingement. As the time for my monthly blog approached, I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to delve into this diagnosis a little bit more. What is it you ask? Ischiofemoral impingement is the result of contact between the lesser trochanter of the femur and the ischium (or lower part of the pelvis.) Patients usually report buttocks or groin pain and this can often mimic symptoms of a hip flexor or hamstring tendinopathy….

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The Value of Pain: Leprosy

Post by: Laura Gold, PT, DPT Leprosy. We’ve almost all heard of it and many of us, at a very early age. It is a common topic in biblical stories and a horrible disease of “biblical” proportions. Leprosy is not nearly as ubiquitous and devastating as it once was — it is far less common, and we have much better means of treating it. Unfortunately, it is still a problem in poorer areas of the world in which people don’t have access to healthcare. But this post isn’t about the epidemiology of leprosy and steps for global eradication. It’s about what leprosy can teach us. What you may not know is that leprosy is not a flesh eating disease. It…

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Innovative Leaders

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As you may have read from Beth’s previous blog October is National Physical Therapy month which means it’s a pretty busy month at our clinic. I can say from personal experience that it has been quite a whirlwind! This is the month that our national organization (APTA) has designated to advocate for the profession and really tell the world what we do and how Physical Therapy can play an important role in your life. That being said, there are a lot of events that all occur within this month’s short 31 days. The slogan for national PT month is “Move Forward” www.moveforwardpt.com. That can mean many things, but here at Motion Stability we have taken that…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Piriformis Syndrome

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS To a runner, the word “Piriformis” is a dreaded, scary, and frustrating word. However, the diagnosis for Piriformis Syndrome is commonly overused and misdiagnosed. I would venture to say that in the years I have been working, I have never actually seen a true case of Pirifomis Syndrome. Many people assume that  hip tightness must be their ‘Piriformis.’ Well I am here to spread the word…that is just not true! Actual Piriformis Syndrome is when the piriformis muscle becomes so tight that it causes numbness, tingling and/or pain down into the respective leg. The piriformis muscle spans the backside of your hip, sits amongst your gluteal muscles, and runs from your tailbone to the outside of…

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Mythbusters: Pt- Tie Down those Shoes

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS With less than 1 month before the big race, I have been struggling with shin splints on both legs. There are many factors that contribute to shin splints such as weakness in the core and hips, poor shoe wear, improper running form/stride length, etc. I wanted to start by trying to address something that could cause an immediate change. I know that my shoes were still in pretty good shape and still had plenty of miles left on them, so I took interest in some research involving proper fit of shoes with various lacing techniques. In the end, I discovered that shoe laces were part of the problem. That’s right, I changed the way…

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Business Travel, Sardines, and Planes

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Can we say PACK IT IN!!!!!!! ABC News just aired a segment (Click Here) about two people getting into a fight during an airplane flight. A female passenger sitting ahead of male passenger tried to recline her seat back to find that she could not because the other passenger used a special bracket that is placed on the pull out tray. The bracket blocks the person from reclining the chair in front of them. Well can you imagine what happens when you want to press your button in your seat so you can sit back…relax….and ‘enjoy your flight’ and then all of the sudden you cannot. Well in this case the next…

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Tiger. Back Pain. Golf. Responsibility.

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Dr. Kharim Khan composed a blog on his response to Tiger Woods’ recent back pain episodes. He gives an explanation of the diagnosis and a discussion about health practitioners responsibility of educating patients on proper evidence based information. I could not write my thoughts better than his, so please read his blog. I would love to hear feedback both from patient’s perspectives as well as health practitioners. Click HERE for the blog. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your…

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