Nerve Pain

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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The Value of Pain: Leprosy

Post by: Laura Gold, PT, DPT Leprosy. We’ve almost all heard of it and many of us, at a very early age. It is a common topic in biblical stories and a horrible disease of “biblical” proportions. Leprosy is not nearly as ubiquitous and devastating as it once was — it is far less common, and we have much better means of treating it. Unfortunately, it is still a problem in poorer areas of the world in which people don’t have access to healthcare. But this post isn’t about the epidemiology of leprosy and steps for global eradication. It’s about what leprosy can teach us. What you may not know is that leprosy is not a flesh eating disease. It…

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Learn About Jozy Altidore’s Hamstring Injury, the Motion Stability way.

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT Have you been watching the World Cup lately? Whether you’re into soccer or not, its hard to avoid all the World Cup news and updates. One of the recent updates is that Jozy Altidore, the US team’s premier striker alongside Clint Dempsey, will not be able to participate in tomorrow’s match versus Germany. This is the World Cup, the top competition for soccer worldwide, and so the conditions are no doubt intense. The weather’s heat and humidity has played a factor, as evident from the water break needed during US match versus Portugal this past Sunday. The level of competition and expectations from worldwide fans are also intense as well. With…

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What is Piriformis Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS If a patient comes in with posterior hip pain or radiating pain down their leg, a lot of times they have already self-diagnosed themselves with Piriformis Syndrome. However, Piriformis Syndrome is not as common as most people think. So, what actually is Piriformis Syndrome? Piriformis Syndrome is when the pirifomis muscle is irritated because it is being overutilized. This is usually secondary to weak lateral hip musculature i.e. your glutes… sensing a theme?? The piriformis muscle extends along the back and lateral side of your hip. When it is aggravated it can cause a deep achey sensation in sitting, walking, or running. Sometimes the muscle becomes tight from overuse and can compress the…

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You’ve Got Some Nerve…

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People fall. People get hurt. Injuries usually get better… as we would hope. There are many cases, however, when common injuries that we think would get better over time do not. Here’s a case in which I have seen people have traumatic injuries such as slipping and falling on an outstretched arm, causing wrist and forearm pain. Most people, including physicians and physical therapists, would assume it’s a wrist injury such as a ligament sprain or fracture, and in most cases, it probably is. But let’s say the injured arm now presents with tingling, redness, or swelling. Now what do you think that may be coming from? One structure that is commonly…

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My Numbness and Tingling Continue, but My Testing Does Not Show Anything!

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Many times we get patients in our clinic who experience ongoing or unresolved nerve symptoms. This can include things such as tingling, numbness, a pinched nerve in the neck, herniated disc, or burning pain that they know is coming from a nerve condition, such as sciatica. The patient may go through exhaustive testing by MRI, which rules out significant involvement from a herniated disc. Or they could participate in an EMG or Nerve Conduction Study which shows the nerve is conducting fine. And yet, the patient still has nerve-like symptoms. This results in the health practitioner sending the patient to physical therapy to try something like traction, whick does not help long term…

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Motion Stability