Movement Sports

 

These Feet Were Made for Walking

By: Clarence Holmes, PT, DPT “OUCH!!!!! I just got done playing tennis and my foot is killing me!” “Man, when I stand at work for more than 20 minutes, my foot really starts to hurt.” “Every time I take a step in the morning, my foot is in so much pain! It eventually gets better, but I don’t know what is going on.  I’ve got to go see my doctor.”   Or do you?  If you have said any of the above, then you definitely want to tune in to this blog post!   Foot pain can be the result of various causes and often times, it is the result of plantar fasciitis.  But do you know what that is? …

Read More

The Injury Prevention Series

Post By: Adrianna Nebedum PT, DPT, OCS This past summer I had the pleasure of working as the physical therapist for Atlanta’s very own WNBA team, the Atlanta Dream.  It gave me an opportunity to see the athletes immediately after an injury. This is often very different from our traditional patient populations when therapists generally don’t see patients until several days or even weeks after injury.  It was an AWESOME experience, but the most resounding thing I took with me was the old adage by Benjamin Franklin, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Recently, there has been a rapid increase of sports injuries in athletes of all ages.   Since 2000, there has been a five-fold increase in serious…

Read More

So you Wanna Stretch your Hamstrings

By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT One of the most popular areas that people like to stretch is their hamstrings. Even with my patients who don’t stretch regularly, it’s the one of the first  places people go. It makes sense too — hamstrings are often tight or feel tight. AND there are lots of ways to stretch them.  Sitting in a chair, sitting on the ground, bending over and touching the toes, lying on your back with a stretch strap, etc, etc. The problem is that many of these stretches DON’T actually target the hamstring muscles… GASP! (Okay, so maybe it’s not that dramatic.) Often when people attempt to stretch their hamstrings they actually put tension on the sciatic nerve instead….

Read More

Are you Squatting Correctly? Part 3

By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT For the past two weeks, we’ve presented some common errors in squatting form and what you can do to make sure you’ve got great technique. In the final post in this series, we’ll take a look at the foot and ankle as well as the overall form you need to achieve a squat that really targets the glutes.   The Penguin As cute as our little feathered, tuxedo-wearing friends may be, you don’t want to find yourself emulating them in the gym. What I’m talking about is feet (one or both) that turn out to accommodate the squatting motion. Often, you will also notice that the arch at the inside of the foot collapses (lowers…

Read More

Are You Squatting Correctly? Part 2

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Last week we introduced the idea that errors in squatting form are very common and can usually be fixed. We looked at a couple of common problems with trunk and lumbar spine posture and gave you some hints for healthier back (and stronger core!) when squatting. This week we’re talking about knees! The Knee Diver If you have this little hiccup in your squat, you might also be experiencing some knee pain! With this movement pattern, the knees creep forward over and past the toes as the squatter gets lower to the floor. This style of squat puts lots of pressure on your knees – especially at the knee cap. Luckily, it is a…

Read More

Are you Squatting Correctly? Part 1

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Drop in to any gym, weight room, crossfit box, or bootcamp session and you’ll be guaranteed to find someone doing some form of squatting. Squatting is a great functional exercise – that means besides being a challenging movement, it has good carryover to the things we do in everyday life like work and sports. Unfortunately, I can also say that you can drop into most of those places and you are just as likely to find someone doing a squat incorrectly. Commonly they are not targeting the intended muscles or even worse stressing other areas of the body and increasing the risk for injury. Over the next few weeks, I’m going to highlight a…

Read More

Training for a Boston Marathon – Interview with Dr. Laura Gold, PT (Part 2)

Our very own Dr. Laura Gold is running the Boston Marathon, which is only a few days away.  Training for a marathon is no easy task, but Dr. Gold has done an amazing job balancing her training and patient care here at the clinic. We sat down with Dr. Gold to ask about her experiences training for the Boston marathon.   What have you done to prepare? I did a conservative training plan, so I didn’t focus on speed but instead on distance. While I did include some speedwork and higher mileage weeks, I was just focused on completing the marathon. I already had the base to do a 15 mile long run, and I built up to a 24…

Read More

Step It Up! Increasing Running Cadence Can Really Take a Load Off (Your Joints!)

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Running related aches, pains, and injuries are often a result of repetitively overloading our joints and other tissues. One simple technique change that may reduce strain on the runner’s body is to increase your cadence. Have you ever watched elite distance runners glide around the track in the 10,000 meter or down the road in a big marathon? If so, you might have noticed how quickly they move their feet- their step rate, or “cadence” is typically at least 180 steps per minute. So how exactly does increasing cadence help prevent or treat injuries? In a study published in 2011 in the ACSM’s journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Heiderscheit and colleagues provide evidence that…

Read More

ACL Tears Growing

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT If you’re a football fan of any sense, whether it be college or NFL, it’s likely your hopes for your team have been sidetracked due to one of its players suffering from an ACL tear. And doesn’t it seem like they are happening more often now? Well this article by CNNSI shows that this year, ACL tears in the NFL are on the rise. The article stated, “We have counted 27 preseason ACL injuries, the highest tally since records were first kept in 2004.” Just as importantly, the article continues to say that “studies show 70 percent of ACL tears result from non-contact injuries.” This means there was no one else that…

Read More

Life After ACL Reconstruction: Avoiding the Dreaded Re-Injury

Post by Laura Gold PT, DPT   ACL injuries are a common season-ending injury among athletes. Given the severity of the injury, many athletes opt for surgical repair of the damaged ligament in order to regain stability at the knee. While a number of athletes who undergo ACL reconstruction return to their sport, less than half of individuals make a full return to their activities following rehabilitation. According to one study looking specifically at high school and college athletes returning to sport following ACL reconstruction, only 50% reported they were able to perform at their pre-injury level. What’s more, somewhere between 6 and 30% of the post-reconstruction population experiences a second ACL injury. As a therapist involved in the rehabilitation…

Read More

Motion Stability