Movement Dysfunction

 

Weakness is the core problem!

Do you think you have a strong core?  The latest trending exercise for core enthusiasts is at Motion Stability! Redcord is  gaining popularity in the world of  wellness and with elite athletes as a strengthening appartaus which emphasizes perfect form and maximizes muscle specificity!  The advantages of redcord as an exercise also play a key role in the world of rehabilitation for the correction of movement dysfunctions found in musculoskeletal pain and chronic pain. Redcord was featured in a recent edition of Marie Claire magazine! Check out the article here:  http://www.neuracpt.com/pdfs/Marie%20Claire%20Cover%20March%202012.pdf _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of…

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Motion Stability is Offering a Course!

Available to all residents, fellows, physical therapists! Please see the link below for more information: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Janda-Course–August-25-26–2012—Atlanta–GA.html?soid=1101912448556&aid=INbaMINud4w. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. Please remember that the information and content, in the absence of a visit with a health care professional, must be considered as an informational/educational service only and is not designed to replace a physician’s independent judgment about the appropriateness of risks of a procedure or condition for a given patient. 

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Lazy Butt Syndrome

As the height of running season approaches, it is prudent to address the importance of the hip musculature in keeping a runner pain-free while maintaining the efficiency required for long distance events. Motion Stability has partnered with Phiddipides, a local running store, to discuss this topic with their runners. A lack of hip muscle strength can cause a myriad of problems in any person, but is especially problematic for runners as the hip muscles not only provide the propulsion for a powerful stride, but also the pelvic stability required to keep the lower legs moving efficiently. For a closer look at how weak hips can literally be a “pain in the butt” for runners, please click here read the article posted…

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Dry Needling as a part of the Georgia Physical Therapy Practice Act under bill HR 145

Thank you to Georgia Representatives Sharon Cooper and Edward Lindsey, the use of dry needling in clinical practice has been adopted into the Georgia Physical Therapy Practice act under bill HR 145. Dry needling is a technique to improve myofascial pain and dysfunction, which includes treatment of trigger points. With proper clinical reasoning and treatment methodology, trigger point dry needling can help significantly with improvements in pain, dysfunction, range of motion, and movement patterns. For more information please view our website: www.motionstability.com For more information on the bill follow this link. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the…

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The Disconnect between Post-partum Women and Low Back Pain

Recently we have seen a growing number of women presenting to our clinic with low back pain and who incidentally have had a baby within the last couple of years. Unfortunately many of these women have been told 1 of 2 things by their medical practitioners: it is an unfortunate side-effect of being post-partum and that it should go away in due time or go try some physical therapy and see if it helps. The problem is that the women is caught between her ObGyn saying it is a post-partum issue and her orthopedist diagnosing her with non-specific back pain, but not attributing it to the fact that she has just had a baby. Oftentimes, the problem goes undiagnosed and…

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Low Back Pain: Multifidus CSA Changes in Athletes

Hides JA, Stanton W, McMahon S, et al. Effect of stabilization training on multifidus muscle cross-sectional area among young elite cricketers with low back pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2008;38(3):101-108. This study reinforces previous studies on low back pain, and the need to perform specific stabilization techniques to improve pain and function rated scores. In this study, cross sectional area (CSA) of lumbar multifidus was found to be assyemtrical in size at the L5 level in young elite crickters with low back pain. With specific retraining of the transversus abdominis, pelvic floor, and lumbar multifidus, athletes with low back pain had improvements in CSA and reports in decrease pain. General exercise strategies for core stabilization need to be specified,…

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US Image: Hypotonic Pelvic Floor – SI Pain?

In the adjacent picture is a real-time ultraound image of the pelvic floor. It is a transverse view, meaning the black area is the bladder, and the white layer below is the pelvic floor musculature. Looking at the image, as you can tell, the left side drops down more, like a tear drop, compared to the right side of the picture…which essentially means that the left pelvic floor is ‘hypotonic’. This could mean the muscle is inhibited or de-innervated. Either way..the patient whom I saw this with, has a 5 year history of SI pain on the same side…unable to sit. She has had multiple interventions from physicians and other PTs attempting to improve myofascial trigger points and other things…where…

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Different Muscles, Different Roles

Bergmark, A. Stability of the lumbar spine: A study in mechanical engineering. Acta Orthop Scand 1989;60:Suppl.230 In this mechanical engineering dissertation, Bergmark differentiates the concept that certain muscles surrounding the lumbar spine play different roles. In physical therapy lingo, we call the larger muscles, that we tend to exercise at the gym, as ‘global’ muscles..while the smaller muscles that connect more vertebrae to vertebra as ‘local’ muscles. ‘Global’ muscles such as the rectus abdominis, external obliques, and latissmus dorsi are more designed for force production, movement and torque. While the ‘local’ muscles such as the lumbar multifidus, primarily the deep multifidus that attach 1-2 vertebrae are designed for intersegmental spinal stability. In daily function we need an interplay between ‘global’…

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Core Stability: Role of the Transversus Abdominis

Welcome to the Motion Stability Recurrent Injury Blog! !

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