Movement Dysfunction

 

To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Snapping Hip

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy As odd as it may sound, have you ever heard a strange noise coming from your hip? A rare condition, Snapping Hip can create a sense of alarm, not because of the pain, but because of the loud snapping noise referred to in its name.  The sound is created by one of two things: The IT Band snapping over the head of the femur. The Iliopsoas Tendon (hip flexor muscle) ineffectively stabilizing the joint, causing it to click as it moves through its range of motion. Both of these scenarios are not cause for immediate concern, but reflect incorrect biomechanics occurring at the hip. If you…

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Run Your Way to Better Walking

Post By: Laura Gold PT, DPT It’s possible that running and other high intensity exercise is beneficial in helping older adults keep that spring in their step. In a world where we often think that running might not be possible or advisable for older adults, I think that’s good news! A study (Here) published in November’s issue of PLOS One and summarized in today’s New York Times Health section  provides evidence that running may be beneficial for older adults in improving walking economy (i.e. how much energy it takes to walk at a given speed). The study looked at two groups of active older adults in their 60s and 70s; one group included regular walkers and the other included regular runners. The…

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Analyze This: A Runners Missing Link

Post By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT You’re a runner, and you’ve got pain. Not a little post workout soreness or the occasional ache, but pain that won’t go away. Or maybe it’s that annoying problem that keeps moving around – first it was the Achilles, then runner’s knee, IT band, plantar fasciitis… one injury improves just to make room for another.  And you’ve done it all. NSAIDs. Stretches. Injections. Massage. Foam Rolling. Exercises. Maybe you’ve even considered (or had) surgery. Yet the problem persists. Your friends, family, co-workers, and perhaps, even your medical professionals are telling you to hang up your running shoes. You’re starting to wonder if they’re right. BUT WAIT! (Says the physical therapist and like-minded “crazy” runner)….

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The Athletic Hip Series: Hip Surgery FAQs

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS So you’re contemplating having surgery to repair your torn labrum or you’ve already had it done. I am sure a number of questions are running through your head. The first thing to remember is to be flexible. Oftentimes, surgeons do not know how your hip truly looks or the extent of the injury until surgery. Surgeons do their best to warn you of this, but it oftentimes does not become a reality until you wake up after the procedure. Remember that they are doing their absolute best to start you on the road to complete recovery. The most common unexpected outcomes after surgery is prolonged bracing, crutches, ambulation, driving, and return to sport. This…

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Tiger. Back Pain. Golf. Responsibility.

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Dr. Kharim Khan composed a blog on his response to Tiger Woods’ recent back pain episodes. He gives an explanation of the diagnosis and a discussion about health practitioners responsibility of educating patients on proper evidence based information. I could not write my thoughts better than his, so please read his blog. I would love to hear feedback both from patient’s perspectives as well as health practitioners. Click HERE for the blog. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your…

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Motion Stability talks Football

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS With the baseball all-star break complete, No. 2 pencils in abundance on the shelves of stores everywhere, and crisp mornings in July complete with the smell of autumn, an avid sports fan, such as myself, cannot help but anticipate the arrival of football season! Year after year, hopes are set to the highest as pre-season hype takes over the radio, television, newspaper and social media. Our yearly mantra seems to be, “this is sure to be our year…. if we can keep everyone healthy.” Our ultimate downfall, year after year, seems to be injury after injury. Most recently in the world of college and professional football, ACL injuries seem to be in abundance…

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What are You Looking at?

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT If ever you are a new patient here at Motion Stability, you’ll likely be asked to walk and/or run in front of me. Have you ever wondered what I am looking at? Well to be honest, I’m looking at all the answers to your problem. Your walking form tells me plenty of answers as to how your body is working. Most, if not all injuries, will manifest itself into the walking form. If you have any strength, flexibility, or joint mobility issues, they will very likely show up in your walking form! The same holds true when I look at your running form on the treadmill. (To make it easier for…

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Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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Yoga and Hip Pain

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Here is a great read from the New York Times about hip pain that can occur during yoga. I need to first say that I do not think doing yoga is a bad thing, nor should people not do yoga. I find this article interesting because in our clinic we do find people getting injured in yoga, not necessarily because of the technique, but because people who are hyperflexible are unaware that increased stretching of an already “stretched out” joint or muscle may cause further stress and lead to injury. This could be females or males. This principle also pertains to any exercise regimen that people may involve themselves with, not just…

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