Lower Extremity

 

The Athletic Hip Series: The Various Hamstring Injuries

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy Anyone who has had, or knows someone who has had, a hamstring tear knows it can look pretty bad. Typically people will report pain, hearing a pop, and a deep, ugly bruise that shows up a couple of days later that can extend past the knee. Even though this sounds really dramatic those are the kinds of injuries you actually want to have, because after the initial inflammation they tend to heal fairly quickly. Then there are the more common and much less talked about tendiopathies. These are the injuries that come on slowly and you do not notice until it’s almost too late. They are…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Snapping Hip

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy As odd as it may sound, have you ever heard a strange noise coming from your hip? A rare condition, Snapping Hip can create a sense of alarm, not because of the pain, but because of the loud snapping noise referred to in its name.  The sound is created by one of two things: The IT Band snapping over the head of the femur. The Iliopsoas Tendon (hip flexor muscle) ineffectively stabilizing the joint, causing it to click as it moves through its range of motion. Both of these scenarios are not cause for immediate concern, but reflect incorrect biomechanics occurring at the hip. If you…

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Run Your Way to Better Walking

Post By: Laura Gold PT, DPT It’s possible that running and other high intensity exercise is beneficial in helping older adults keep that spring in their step. In a world where we often think that running might not be possible or advisable for older adults, I think that’s good news! A study (Here) published in November’s issue of PLOS One and summarized in today’s New York Times Health section  provides evidence that running may be beneficial for older adults in improving walking economy (i.e. how much energy it takes to walk at a given speed). The study looked at two groups of active older adults in their 60s and 70s; one group included regular walkers and the other included regular runners. The…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Hip Surgery FAQs

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS So you’re contemplating having surgery to repair your torn labrum or you’ve already had it done. I am sure a number of questions are running through your head. The first thing to remember is to be flexible. Oftentimes, surgeons do not know how your hip truly looks or the extent of the injury until surgery. Surgeons do their best to warn you of this, but it oftentimes does not become a reality until you wake up after the procedure. Remember that they are doing their absolute best to start you on the road to complete recovery. The most common unexpected outcomes after surgery is prolonged bracing, crutches, ambulation, driving, and return to sport. This…

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Motion Stability talks Football

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS With the baseball all-star break complete, No. 2 pencils in abundance on the shelves of stores everywhere, and crisp mornings in July complete with the smell of autumn, an avid sports fan, such as myself, cannot help but anticipate the arrival of football season! Year after year, hopes are set to the highest as pre-season hype takes over the radio, television, newspaper and social media. Our yearly mantra seems to be, “this is sure to be our year…. if we can keep everyone healthy.” Our ultimate downfall, year after year, seems to be injury after injury. Most recently in the world of college and professional football, ACL injuries seem to be in abundance…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Impingement

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS “Runner’s take your mark!” It’s that time of year again when hundreds and thousands of runners line Peachtree to run Atlanta’s annual July 4th Peachtree Roadrace. It is a day of celebration and festivities that culminate with the highly coveted and secretive t-shirt. From a physical therapy perspective it is the time of year that runners flood your clinic trying to get a couple of appointments in to get themselves bandaged up and to the Peachtree Road starting line. Sometimes the stars align and a little TLC from your favorite therapist gets you back out on the road, but unfortunately that is not always the case. One of those instances is the elusive…

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Learn About Jozy Altidore’s Hamstring Injury, the Motion Stability way.

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT Have you been watching the World Cup lately? Whether you’re into soccer or not, its hard to avoid all the World Cup news and updates. One of the recent updates is that Jozy Altidore, the US team’s premier striker alongside Clint Dempsey, will not be able to participate in tomorrow’s match versus Germany. This is the World Cup, the top competition for soccer worldwide, and so the conditions are no doubt intense. The weather’s heat and humidity has played a factor, as evident from the water break needed during US match versus Portugal this past Sunday. The level of competition and expectations from worldwide fans are also intense as well. With…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Trochanteric Bursitis

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS Do you have lateral hip pain that is painful to lay on? If so, then you may have trochanteric bursitis. “What is bursitis,” you ask? Well bursitis is inflammation of the bursa that lies between the IT band and greater trochanter. When the IT band it too tight, it can rub on the bursa causing inflammation and irritation. As we discussed in my previous post, the IT band can get tight from a number of factors but most primarily from decreased strength of the hip abductors/glutes. When the bursa is inflammed it can get swollen and be painful to the touch or even to lie on it. Some people will experience pain when…

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Balance Slow to Run Fast

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT Have you ever taken the time to look at how you run? It’s an amazingly efficient combination of movements in the human body. If you take a closer look you’ll notice a few key elements: It’s a controlled fall. When both feet are in the air you are momentarily floating in air as your body prepares to land. When you land, it is not a giant disaster. You load and absorb your weight while also storing energy to bounce right back. Studies show that you absorb between 1.5 to 3 times your body weight upon impact, yet you hardly feel it! During your stance phase, when your foot is on the ground,…

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What is Piriformis Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS If a patient comes in with posterior hip pain or radiating pain down their leg, a lot of times they have already self-diagnosed themselves with Piriformis Syndrome. However, Piriformis Syndrome is not as common as most people think. So, what actually is Piriformis Syndrome? Piriformis Syndrome is when the pirifomis muscle is irritated because it is being overutilized. This is usually secondary to weak lateral hip musculature i.e. your glutes… sensing a theme?? The piriformis muscle extends along the back and lateral side of your hip. When it is aggravated it can cause a deep achey sensation in sitting, walking, or running. Sometimes the muscle becomes tight from overuse and can compress the…

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Motion Stability