Internal Systems

 

Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

Read More

How to be a GOALkeeper in 2015

Post By: Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The fast approaching end of December marks a time of celebration with family and friends as another year comes to a close. It is easy to look forward to a New Year in celebration and excitement as a new beginning with the best intentions to make change. Often we find ourselves setting similar goals to those made in years past, which tend to fall by the wayside as lives become hectic and priorities shift to unexpected distractions.  Rather than continuing to break cycles of goal setting for another upcoming year, consider the following for success in your endeavors. REFLECTION American philosopher, psychologist and educational reformer John Dewey said, “we do not learn from…

Read More

The Value of Pain: Leprosy

Post by: Laura Gold, PT, DPT Leprosy. We’ve almost all heard of it and many of us, at a very early age. It is a common topic in biblical stories and a horrible disease of “biblical” proportions. Leprosy is not nearly as ubiquitous and devastating as it once was — it is far less common, and we have much better means of treating it. Unfortunately, it is still a problem in poorer areas of the world in which people don’t have access to healthcare. But this post isn’t about the epidemiology of leprosy and steps for global eradication. It’s about what leprosy can teach us. What you may not know is that leprosy is not a flesh eating disease. It…

Read More

You’ve Got Some Nerve…

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT People fall. People get hurt. Injuries usually get better… as we would hope. There are many cases, however, when common injuries that we think would get better over time do not. Here’s a case in which I have seen people have traumatic injuries such as slipping and falling on an outstretched arm, causing wrist and forearm pain. Most people, including physicians and physical therapists, would assume it’s a wrist injury such as a ligament sprain or fracture, and in most cases, it probably is. But let’s say the injured arm now presents with tingling, redness, or swelling. Now what do you think that may be coming from? One structure that is commonly…

Read More

My Numbness and Tingling Continue, but My Testing Does Not Show Anything!

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Many times we get patients in our clinic who experience ongoing or unresolved nerve symptoms. This can include things such as tingling, numbness, a pinched nerve in the neck, herniated disc, or burning pain that they know is coming from a nerve condition, such as sciatica. The patient may go through exhaustive testing by MRI, which rules out significant involvement from a herniated disc. Or they could participate in an EMG or Nerve Conduction Study which shows the nerve is conducting fine. And yet, the patient still has nerve-like symptoms. This results in the health practitioner sending the patient to physical therapy to try something like traction, whick does not help long term…

Read More

It’s All in How You Breathe…

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Here’s a link by a well known Physical Therapist, Mike Reinold, which was passed onto me, that discusses the role of breathing and its correlation with low back pain. Many people think core strength for spinal stability is simply done by your abdominal muscles, but your diaphragm and respiratory patterns are also shown to help improve spinal stability. This article goes into further detail to discuss how a study has shown that people without low back pain tend to inhale slightly at the time of lifting an object, where people with chronic low back pain tend to exhale. The staff at Motion Stability are versed in breathing recruitment techniques that can help…

Read More

Exercises To Prevent Lower Back Pain

What Exercises for My Core Can Help Prevent Lower Back Pain? Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT First – generally there are different roles of muscles in your trunk. Typically the smaller ones closest to your spine are considered ‘local’ muscles. Such muscles as the transversus abdominis, diaphragm, pelvic floor, and lumbar multifidus provide segmental control of your lumbar vertebra. Real-time ultrasound imaging can be used to visualize the proper contraction of these muscles as we cannot see these muscles from the superficial skin. So first step in core stability is to ensure that the smaller muscles are engaging properly. Then you have ‘global’ muscles which are the larger muscles – such as rectus abdominis, obliques, paraspinal muscles. These muscles…

Read More

Stretches for lower back pain?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT The most common muscle that is strained on the side of your back is the quadratus lumborum (QL). The QL attaches from the side and bottom of your rib cage to the top of your pelvis. There is a right and left QL and when it contracts its side bends your spine, as well as extends the back.Lets say your right QL feels tight – to stretch this: 1. While sitting place a thick book or half foam roll under your opposite / left hip. 2. Lean to the left, away from your painful side, fulcruming over the roll and left hip. 3. Slightly bend forward and rotate towards the right. Keep your right…

Read More

How do I manage my back pain on a daily basis?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT First, remain positive. Many people dealiing with chronic back pain can become discouraged and even depressed that their pain does not let them do what they want to do. This can lead to a fear-avoidance belief that takes them away from doing activities that they physically should be able to do.  From there it is important to establish 2-3 activites during the day that cause back pain – such as sitting, standing, or household activities such as vacuuming. It is just as important to determine the time in which the pain begins. Many patients will complain of pain with a prolonged/sustained activity after 10-20 minutes. What this means is that the muscle endurance of…

Read More

Can physical therapy strengthen weak bones?

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Physical Therapy can focus on improving bone strength through proper prescription of exercise base therapy to properly gauge the intensity and load on a patient with weaker bones, such as osteoporosis, fractures, atrophic diseases. This could be through aquatic therapy, anti-gravity support systems, and other modified weight-bearing exercises. It is important to have an experienced Physical Therapist to know how to properly dose the intensity/duration of exercises to stimulate proper bone growth/density without over or under doing it. _________________________ Medical Disclaimer: Motion Stability has created and compiled the content on its websites for your information and use. This information is not intended to replace or modify the medical advice of your doctor or health…

Read More

Motion Stability