Health

 

Reflections on IADMS

By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT October was a busy month for Emma and myself! As most of you know, our primary clinical interests are dancers and performing artists, thus our partnership with Atlanta Ballet.  Both of us are involved in multiple organizations related to physical therapy for dancers.   The International Association of Dance Medicine and Science has members from all areas of healthcare that treat dancers, including MDs, DOs, PTs, athletic trainers, nutritionists, and others.  They hold their annual meeting in North America every two years.  This year, Emma and  I were both honored to speak at the conference, representing Motion Stability, Atlanta Ballet, and Mercer University. Emma partnered with our former Emory PT student, Tiernan Damas,…

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To Stretch Or Not To Stretch?

by Jake Reynolds, PT, DPT Spine & Sports Clinic of Motion Stability   I frequently have clients ask about stretching and tend find a lot of confusion about proper technique and dosage. This confusion can lend itself to injury as opposed to injury prevention and performance enhancement (the intent of stretching). If we are stretching incorrectly you may actually prime your muscle for injury. For the sake of clarity, lets get a one thing out of the way: yes—stretching is important. In fact the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) outlines the following guidelines for flexibility training in terms of risk factor reduction for the development of injuries and preventable diseases:   At least two or three days of stretching…

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Eating Disorders, RED-S and Physical Therapy

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT* Many people are familiar with eating disorders and disordered eating, but there is a significant amount of myth, misinformation and stigma surrounding these topics. There are 8-10 million Americans struggling with eating disorders. This statistic includes diagnoses of anorexia, bulimia, compulsive over-eating, and non-specific eating disorders that do not squarely fit into another category. A true eating disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis and may be accompanied by other psychiatric diagnoses, including depression, anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Anorexia has a 12x higher mortality rate for girls 15-24 years of age than all other causes of death. Eating disorders are often overlooked and missed by parents, friends, coaches, teachers, and healthcare professionals. Therefore, it…

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Lessons From A Hypermobile Physical Therapist

By: Ted Ziaylek PT, DPT Hypermobility is used to describe joints that can bend further than normal. It is also commonly referred to as being “double jointed”. There are many things that can cause hypermobility. In basic terms the structures surrounding the joints (ligaments and capsules) are loose, which allows the joint to bend further than normal. I have learned a few things from working with patients who are hypermobile, as well as being hypermobile myself, about ways to help protect your joints. Firstly, people who are hypermobile often feel like they need to stretch. The problem here is that due to the laxity (or loose ligaments) in the joint we tend to stretch the joint well before the muscle….

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Understanding Chronic Pain: It’s All In Your Head

By: Deanna Camilo, PT, DPT The first thing we need to know in order to begin our understanding of pain is that pain is a product of the brain’s interpretation of two things: An unpleasant sensation. The circumstances surrounding the introduction of the unpleasant sensation. All sensory information (touch, vision, taste, etc.) must be evaluated by the nervous system, and accurate interpretation of this information depends on the context surrounding the introduction of the sensation.  Pain does not become pain until the brain interprets the sensation as dangerous or threatening. “Dangerous or threatening” is determined by contextual clues provided by the rest of the body: emotions, previous memories, and potential consequences of each response. Thus, the amount of pain you…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Snapping Hip

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy As odd as it may sound, have you ever heard a strange noise coming from your hip? A rare condition, Snapping Hip can create a sense of alarm, not because of the pain, but because of the loud snapping noise referred to in its name.  The sound is created by one of two things: The IT Band snapping over the head of the femur. The Iliopsoas Tendon (hip flexor muscle) ineffectively stabilizing the joint, causing it to click as it moves through its range of motion. Both of these scenarios are not cause for immediate concern, but reflect incorrect biomechanics occurring at the hip. If you…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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12 Things I Learned in my Year of Running

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As some of you may know my New Year’s resolution for 2014 was to run 1 race a month. I did not put any stipulations on it except that it had to be a sanctioned race aka  I had to pay for it and I got a shirt at the end of it.  The distance did not matter, but I did want to attempt getting to a half-marathon somewhere in the middle of all these races. The half-marathon was important to me because it was the race that has alluded me over the past couple of years due to a variety of injuries or unexpected life circumstances. In my mind, completing a half…

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How to be a GOALkeeper in 2015

Post By: Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The fast approaching end of December marks a time of celebration with family and friends as another year comes to a close. It is easy to look forward to a New Year in celebration and excitement as a new beginning with the best intentions to make change. Often we find ourselves setting similar goals to those made in years past, which tend to fall by the wayside as lives become hectic and priorities shift to unexpected distractions.  Rather than continuing to break cycles of goal setting for another upcoming year, consider the following for success in your endeavors. REFLECTION American philosopher, psychologist and educational reformer John Dewey said, “we do not learn from…

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Tis’ The Stressful Season!

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT How many of you feel this underlying tension or anxiety during this time of season? So when you say to someone Happy Holidays!!! – with a sense of cheer, peace and joy there’s also this funny vibe in you that says “ohhhh man…ever since Thanksgiving I am so stressed because I have end of the year things to take care of at work, at home, my kids’ school, getting ready for family coming over, buying gifts, dealing with traffic..and now I or my loved one has a winter cold. All at the same time! Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!”Perhaps you do not think that at all..and that’s simply just me.Even if it is just me, I…

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Motion Stability