Life After ACL Reconstruction: Avoiding the Dreaded Re-Injury

Post by Laura Gold PT, DPT   ACL injuries are a common season-ending injury among athletes. Given the severity of the injury, many athletes opt for surgical repair of the damaged ligament in order to regain stability at the knee. While a number of athletes who undergo ACL reconstruction return to their sport, less than half of individuals make a full return to their activities following rehabilitation. According to one study looking specifically at high school and college athletes returning to sport following ACL reconstruction, only 50% reported they were able to perform at their pre-injury level. What’s more, somewhere between 6 and 30% of the post-reconstruction population experiences a second ACL injury. As a therapist involved in the rehabilitation…

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The True Promotion of Health

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS In light of recent buzz concerning the “Fit Mom’s” comments regarding the “Curvy Girl Lingerie” campaign, I felt compelled to speak about this issue for which I feel very passionate. As a physical therapist in the Atlanta area, I am a member of the healthcare profession whose expertise lies in health and wellness. I also teach part time at a local physical therapy program in Atlanta where we emphasize health promotion throughout the curriculum. With such a background, I would like to offer my two cents on this controversial topic. Overall health and wellness should be regarded in three aspects: physical, mental, and emotional/spiritual. Initially, the “love your body” campaign blossomed to address…

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Runner’s High for Chronic Pain?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS October and November have been exciting months, especially for our runners… you know who you are! I want to congratulate all of you on achieving a goal that you might have even embarked on over a year ago. Your hard work, sweat, aches, and pains have paid off and we are enjoying hearing the results pouring in from the finish lines of New York, D.C., Atlanta, and many more! I personally feel so privileged to have been able to help you take those final steps across the finish line, so thank you! No matter what distance your run (or whatever endurance sport you participate in), you know that crossing that finish line is…

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Yoga and Hip Pain

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Here is a great read from the New York Times about hip pain that can occur during yoga. I need to first say that I do not think doing yoga is a bad thing, nor should people not do yoga. I find this article interesting because in our clinic we do find people getting injured in yoga, not necessarily because of the technique, but because people who are hyperflexible are unaware that increased stretching of an already “stretched out” joint or muscle may cause further stress and lead to injury. This could be females or males. This principle also pertains to any exercise regimen that people may involve themselves with, not just…

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Nerve Injuries in Athletes

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT If you know me, you know I’m a big Lakers fan! I was absolutely excited when the Lakers traded for Steve Nash from the Phoenix Suns two years ago. Steve Nash has been one of the best point guards of our time. However, last year Steve had a freak injury that fractured his fibula and caused nerve damage in his leg as well. It took him out of a large chunk of games last year to recover. I will be the first to say that I am not his Physical Therapist, nor do I even know the extent of his injury. In this article, he does state that the team’s Physical Therapist…

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Can your Muscles be the Source of your Pain?

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Here’s a link from the Washington Post that talks about the role of myofascial pain in undiagnosed or unresolved pain. There is a tendency for patients to believe their pain is only from a structural problem such as a herniated disc, but in actuality there is a large contribution of pain that originates from the muscles and fascia of your body or what is called the myofascial system. Trigger points in the muscle and restrictions in your fascia around the muscles and joint of your body are just another tissue in your body that can be a pain generator. It is important to find a health practitioner that understands how to differentially…

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SI Joint Dysfunction… Under or Over Diagnosed?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS A patient of mine recently forwarded me this article. I found it interesting because as a Physical Therapist, we are told more often than not that the SI joint is overly diagnosed by us PTs. So after reading this article I was wondering…which is it? If doctors are not diagnosing it enough and PTs are diagnosing it too much, what’s the problem? Where is the disconnect? I think the happy medium is that with a thorough examination and evaluation both the SI joint and lumbar spine should be screened for possible involvement. Oftentimes I have found with my own patients that it is not nearly as black and white as we clinicians want it…

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Pregnant and Running?

Whether you are a mom-to-be or a new mom, your body experiences changes that can affect your running biomechanics. In this podcast, physical therapists Bryan Heidersheit, PT, PhD, and Liz Chumanov, PT, DPT from the University of Wisconsin, discuss findings from their study investigating this topic, as well as, their clinical experiences with pregnant and postpartum runners. http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Radio/Detail.aspx?cid=d56f90c7-19dd-4689-9776-8fb6238a453a New aches and pains slowing you down? Trying to get back to running following pregnancy? We can help. The physical therapists at Movement Sports can help.   Call us today to set up a consultation.

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Movement: A Priority for the Older Adult

While it is important for people to be physically active at all ages, movement of our bodies on  a regular basis becomes even more critical as we age. Regular physical activity can prevent, slow, or even reverse many of the disease processes common among older adults. It is also important to remember that while some changes in our tissues are normal with age, we can most effectively keep muscles, bones, and joints healthy by using them; in other words, movement and exercise are the closest things we have to a fountain of youth. When it comes to making choices about staying active for you or an older adult member of your family, consider these facts:   Regular physical activity is…

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Motion Stability