Things All People Should Know about Physical Therapy

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS So often after treating patients for a few visits, they express to me how they have had a very different view of physical therapy up until this point. So, I decided to put together a list of things that everyone should know about physical therapy! 1. Not all Physical Therapy is created equal: While it is true that all physical therapists must take the same licensing exam and graduate from an accredited university who must cover the same basic information, not all PTs practice the same. Emphases of skills, areas of specialization or interest as well as personal beliefs are just a few of the factors that shape an individual’s practice as a physical…

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Training for a Boston Marathon – Interview with Dr. Laura Gold, PT

Our very own Dr. Laura Gold, PT is running the Boston Marathon, which is exactly one week away. Training for a marathon is no easy task, but Dr. Gold has done an amazing job balancing her training and patient care here at clinic. We sat down with Dr. Gold to ask her about her experiences training for the Boston marathon. Why did you choose to do the Boston Marathon? I choose Boston because it’s the “race of all races”.  It’s a bucket list item that all runners want to do. It is my second marathon, so it is a bit unusual. I have been running since I was 11, and I’ve always done half marathons. Last year I decided to…

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The Athletic Hip Series: What is IT Band Syndrome?

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS IT, otherwise known as the Iliotibial Band, is a common source of lateral knee pain in runners. However, most people do not realize that this is an issue oftentimes stemming from the hip. Pain generated from disorders of the IT band can be present at its origination along the lateral pelvis all the way to the lateral knee. The IT band is usually over-utilized due to poor lower extremity mechanics. Weak hip musculature, primarily the glutes, cause increased reliance on the IT band to stabilize the knee. This scenario can cause the IT band to get caught in a “catch-22”: overuse of the IT band causes increased tightness of the TFL (Tensor Fascia…

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My Numbness and Tingling Continue, but My Testing Does Not Show Anything!

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Many times we get patients in our clinic who experience ongoing or unresolved nerve symptoms. This can include things such as tingling, numbness, a pinched nerve in the neck, herniated disc, or burning pain that they know is coming from a nerve condition, such as sciatica. The patient may go through exhaustive testing by MRI, which rules out significant involvement from a herniated disc. Or they could participate in an EMG or Nerve Conduction Study which shows the nerve is conducting fine. And yet, the patient still has nerve-like symptoms. This results in the health practitioner sending the patient to physical therapy to try something like traction, whick does not help long term…

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Pain? Injured? Get Moving!

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS Did you know that our bodies can produce the best medicine to heal injury and relieve chronic pain? All you need to do to take advantage of this medicine is to get moving! Even gentle movement as performed with Tai chi or yoga or simply deep breathing can block pain producing hormones and aid in the body’s natural inflammatory process. Pain expert David Butler, who the Motion Stability team had the pleasure of learning from last month at a class held in Atlanta, describes this effect as tapping into our body’s pharmacy that is open 24 hours a day- even on holidays! SO- if you have had long standing unresolved pain, get moving!…

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The Athletic Hip and its Injuries

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS You may be asking yourself, “What IS the Athletic Hip?” It is a joint that serves as a junction zone for the leg and the pelvis or low back. It is a hip that is often painful and injured as a result of overuse or traumatic activities. It is a joint that is not arthritic and in need of a replacement, but is very painful and can interfere in a person’s ability to participate in all kinds of physical activity. It is an area that is often hard to diagnose, which results in many trips to physicians, multiple xrays and MRIs, and many bouts of unsuccessful physical therapy. It is a joint that…

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How You Can Incorporate Olympic Training Methods into your Fitness Routine

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS “Hi, my name is Maggie and I am an Olympic junkie!” I will admit that I am an absolute Olympic fanatic. My Olympics obsession began as a little girl sitting at my grandma’s kitchen table watching Katerina Witt skate to the gold medal in the ’88 Calgary Olympics and being completely entranced. Over the years, my impression of the Olympics has matured past pretty costumes and ‘dancing on ice’ to one where true athletes get to realize their dreams after years and years of training, injuries, and the ups and downs of competition. As the articles and news stories have started coming out on the upcoming Sochi Olympics, I have loved reading how…

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Is Back Pain All in Your Head?

Post by Brian Yee, PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT What a great article from NPR! This article identifies that recurring back problems are not solely from the structure in your spine such as a herniated disc or degeneration or the vertebra, but rather it brings attention to the nervous system itself. Your nervous system, located within your spine, is your main transducer that signals to your brain that you are or are not in pain. This article states: “Research is showing that the pain often has nothing to do with the mechanics of the spine, but with the way the nervous system is behaving, according to Dr. James Rainville of New England Baptist Hospital in Boston.” “This is a different way…

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Step It Up! Increasing Running Cadence Can Really Take a Load Off (Your Joints!)

Post by Laura Gold, PT, DPT Running related aches, pains, and injuries are often a result of repetitively overloading our joints and other tissues. One simple technique change that may reduce strain on the runner’s body is to increase your cadence. Have you ever watched elite distance runners glide around the track in the 10,000 meter or down the road in a big marathon? If so, you might have noticed how quickly they move their feet- their step rate, or “cadence” is typically at least 180 steps per minute. So how exactly does increasing cadence help prevent or treat injuries? In a study published in 2011 in the ACSM’s journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Heiderscheit and colleagues provide evidence that…

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Are you ready to HIIT the gym?

Post by Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS Cross fit. P90X. Insanity. T25. Boot Camp. Fit Wit. WOD. Tabata. Though it comes in many names and various packages, high intensity interval training (HIIT) has become one of the most popular workouts of recent times. A HIIT workout is characterized by alternating short bursts of exercise at near maximal effort with little periods of rest. Due to the high intensity of exercise, these workouts are typically of shorter duration than traditional exercise programs in order to burn the same or more amounts of body fat. HIIT exercisers will also notice a strong improvement in aerobic capacity, or cardiovascular endurance. Thus, many endurance athletes are turning to HIIT workouts as a form of…

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