October is National Physical Therapy Month

Post By: Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS October is National Physical Therapy Month! We have celebrated this month with reflection for gratitude to be a part of such an amazing profession that is ever growing and changing. We are able to have invaluable relationships with our patients who trust us to aid them during some of their most vulnerable times, and the ability to constantly push ourselves and our colleagues by initiating research to find answers to the unknown. At Motion Stability, we take pride in doing things a bit “outside of the box” in an effort to provide the highest quality of care possible. Although our practice theories may be a bit different from other PT practices in the…

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These Feet Were Made for Walking

By: Clarence Holmes, PT, DPT “OUCH!!!!! I just got done playing tennis and my foot is killing me!” “Man, when I stand at work for more than 20 minutes, my foot really starts to hurt.” “Every time I take a step in the morning, my foot is in so much pain! It eventually gets better, but I don’t know what is going on.  I’ve got to go see my doctor.”   Or do you?  If you have said any of the above, then you definitely want to tune in to this blog post!   Foot pain can be the result of various causes and often times, it is the result of plantar fasciitis.  But do you know what that is? …

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The Injury Prevention Series

Post By: Adrianna Nebedum PT, DPT, OCS This past summer I had the pleasure of working as the physical therapist for Atlanta’s very own WNBA team, the Atlanta Dream.  It gave me an opportunity to see the athletes immediately after an injury. This is often very different from our traditional patient populations when therapists generally don’t see patients until several days or even weeks after injury.  It was an AWESOME experience, but the most resounding thing I took with me was the old adage by Benjamin Franklin, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Recently, there has been a rapid increase of sports injuries in athletes of all ages.   Since 2000, there has been a five-fold increase in serious…

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Analyze This: A Runners Missing Link

Post By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT You’re a runner, and you’ve got pain. Not a little post workout soreness or the occasional ache, but pain that won’t go away. Or maybe it’s that annoying problem that keeps moving around – first it was the Achilles, then runner’s knee, IT band, plantar fasciitis… one injury improves just to make room for another.  And you’ve done it all. NSAIDs. Stretches. Injections. Massage. Foam Rolling. Exercises. Maybe you’ve even considered (or had) surgery. Yet the problem persists. Your friends, family, co-workers, and perhaps, even your medical professionals are telling you to hang up your running shoes. You’re starting to wonder if they’re right. BUT WAIT! (Says the physical therapist and like-minded “crazy” runner)….

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The Athletic Hip Series: Piriformis Syndrome

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS To a runner, the word “Piriformis” is a dreaded, scary, and frustrating word. However, the diagnosis for Piriformis Syndrome is commonly overused and misdiagnosed. I would venture to say that in the years I have been working, I have never actually seen a true case of Pirifomis Syndrome. Many people assume that  hip tightness must be their ‘Piriformis.’ Well I am here to spread the word…that is just not true! Actual Piriformis Syndrome is when the piriformis muscle becomes so tight that it causes numbness, tingling and/or pain down into the respective leg. The piriformis muscle spans the backside of your hip, sits amongst your gluteal muscles, and runs from your tailbone to the outside of…

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Mythbusters: Pt- Tie Down those Shoes

Post by Beth Collier PT, DPT, OCS With less than 1 month before the big race, I have been struggling with shin splints on both legs. There are many factors that contribute to shin splints such as weakness in the core and hips, poor shoe wear, improper running form/stride length, etc. I wanted to start by trying to address something that could cause an immediate change. I know that my shoes were still in pretty good shape and still had plenty of miles left on them, so I took interest in some research involving proper fit of shoes with various lacing techniques. In the end, I discovered that shoe laces were part of the problem. That’s right, I changed the way…

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Business Travel, Sardines, and Planes

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT Can we say PACK IT IN!!!!!!! ABC News just aired a segment (Click Here) about two people getting into a fight during an airplane flight. A female passenger sitting ahead of male passenger tried to recline her seat back to find that she could not because the other passenger used a special bracket that is placed on the pull out tray. The bracket blocks the person from reclining the chair in front of them. Well can you imagine what happens when you want to press your button in your seat so you can sit back…relax….and ‘enjoy your flight’ and then all of the sudden you cannot. Well in this case the next…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Hip Surgery FAQs

Post by Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS So you’re contemplating having surgery to repair your torn labrum or you’ve already had it done. I am sure a number of questions are running through your head. The first thing to remember is to be flexible. Oftentimes, surgeons do not know how your hip truly looks or the extent of the injury until surgery. Surgeons do their best to warn you of this, but it oftentimes does not become a reality until you wake up after the procedure. Remember that they are doing their absolute best to start you on the road to complete recovery. The most common unexpected outcomes after surgery is prolonged bracing, crutches, ambulation, driving, and return to sport. This…

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Exercise Prescription

Post by Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT As a physical therapist, I love giving my patients home exercises. Like a physician prescribing medications, I too take great care in prescribing exercises for my patients to perform at home. You’ll likely do plenty of exercises during a physical therapy visit, but the exercises performed at home are the most important in any treatment plan. Ever wonder how your home exercises work? Here are the top 5 characteristics for your home exercises 1. Home exercises will address the most important issue of your condition If your physical therapist gives you an exercise to perform at home, it’s a really important to do them. This is because your physical therapist has…

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So you Wanna Stretch your Hamstrings

By: Laura Gold, PT, DPT One of the most popular areas that people like to stretch is their hamstrings. Even with my patients who don’t stretch regularly, it’s the one of the first  places people go. It makes sense too — hamstrings are often tight or feel tight. AND there are lots of ways to stretch them.  Sitting in a chair, sitting on the ground, bending over and touching the toes, lying on your back with a stretch strap, etc, etc. The problem is that many of these stretches DON’T actually target the hamstring muscles… GASP! (Okay, so maybe it’s not that dramatic.) Often when people attempt to stretch their hamstrings they actually put tension on the sciatic nerve instead….

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Motion Stability