The Athletic Hip Series-Athletic Pubalgia

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy Athletic Pubalgia is more commonly known as a Sports Hernia. People with a Sports Hernia will initially complain of groin pain that spreads to the inner thigh as the condition progresses. With the possible involvement of the genitor-femoral nerve, it can also present with numbness or other nerve-related symptoms in the thigh, the scrotum in males, and  the pubis in females. Most often the pain is aggravated by extreme and repetitive twisting, turning, or extending the affected hip and primarily affects football, hockey, tennis and soccer players. This diagnosis can be a frustrating one for the patient and clinician alike due to the fact that it…

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The Gift of the Arts

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT February 2015 has seen my dream become a reality.  In the first 2 weeks of the month, I will have seen six live performances; “Tuck Everlasting” at the Alliance Theater, “Romeo and Juliet” and “Snow White” with the Company and Fellowship dancers at Atlanta Ballet, Alvin Ailey on tour at the Fox Theater, and Several Dancers Core at Callanwolde.  When it comes down to it, I am a fan first.  I am a fan of dance, of performing, of expression, and of music.  It is my honor to also treat these talented and physical beings.  I get as much joy out of watching my 12 year-old patient perform as Clara for the…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Snapping Hip

By: Maggie Gebhardt PT, DPT, OCS Adjunct Clinical Professor- Mercer University, Division of Physical Therapy As odd as it may sound, have you ever heard a strange noise coming from your hip? A rare condition, Snapping Hip can create a sense of alarm, not because of the pain, but because of the loud snapping noise referred to in its name.  The sound is created by one of two things: The IT Band snapping over the head of the femur. The Iliopsoas Tendon (hip flexor muscle) ineffectively stabilizing the joint, causing it to click as it moves through its range of motion. Both of these scenarios are not cause for immediate concern, but reflect incorrect biomechanics occurring at the hip. If you…

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Resolve to Relieve the Headache

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Brian blogged a few weeks ago about the “holiday stress factor” and the effects that stress can have on our bodies and pain.  One of the primary pathologies I see in my patients is chronic headache and jaw pain.  Many of my patients describe their headaches as “migraine” and their facial pain as “TMJ,” often without knowing the truth of their pain.  Did you know that tight muscles and trigger pints around the head, neck, and shoulder can actually refer pain patterns that look and feel very much like migraine headaches and temporomandibular dysfunction?  We know from the work of Dr. Janet Travell, Dr. David Simons and others that each muscle in…

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12 Things I Learned in my Year of Running

Post By: Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS As some of you may know my New Year’s resolution for 2014 was to run 1 race a month. I did not put any stipulations on it except that it had to be a sanctioned race aka  I had to pay for it and I got a shirt at the end of it.  The distance did not matter, but I did want to attempt getting to a half-marathon somewhere in the middle of all these races. The half-marathon was important to me because it was the race that has alluded me over the past couple of years due to a variety of injuries or unexpected life circumstances. In my mind, completing a half…

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How to be a GOALkeeper in 2015

Post By: Beth Collier, PT, DPT, OCS The fast approaching end of December marks a time of celebration with family and friends as another year comes to a close. It is easy to look forward to a New Year in celebration and excitement as a new beginning with the best intentions to make change. Often we find ourselves setting similar goals to those made in years past, which tend to fall by the wayside as lives become hectic and priorities shift to unexpected distractions.  Rather than continuing to break cycles of goal setting for another upcoming year, consider the following for success in your endeavors. REFLECTION American philosopher, psychologist and educational reformer John Dewey said, “we do not learn from…

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Tis’ The Stressful Season!

Post by Brian Yee PT, DPT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT How many of you feel this underlying tension or anxiety during this time of season? So when you say to someone Happy Holidays!!! – with a sense of cheer, peace and joy there’s also this funny vibe in you that says “ohhhh man…ever since Thanksgiving I am so stressed because I have end of the year things to take care of at work, at home, my kids’ school, getting ready for family coming over, buying gifts, dealing with traffic..and now I or my loved one has a winter cold. All at the same time! Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!”Perhaps you do not think that at all..and that’s simply just me.Even if it is just me, I…

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Run Your Way to Better Walking

Post By: Laura Gold PT, DPT It’s possible that running and other high intensity exercise is beneficial in helping older adults keep that spring in their step. In a world where we often think that running might not be possible or advisable for older adults, I think that’s good news! A study (Here) published in November’s issue of PLOS One and summarized in today’s New York Times Health section  provides evidence that running may be beneficial for older adults in improving walking economy (i.e. how much energy it takes to walk at a given speed). The study looked at two groups of active older adults in their 60s and 70s; one group included regular walkers and the other included regular runners. The…

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The Athletic Hip Series: Ischiofemoral Impingement and Tendinopathies

Post by Maggie Gebhardt, PT, DPT, OCS In the clinic, therapists tend to see injuries happen in waves. One month its shoulders and the next it’s a completely different body part. Recently, I have had a rash of patients coming in with the diagnosis of ischiofemoral impingement. As the time for my monthly blog approached, I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to delve into this diagnosis a little bit more. What is it you ask? Ischiofemoral impingement is the result of contact between the lesser trochanter of the femur and the ischium (or lower part of the pelvis.) Patients usually report buttocks or groin pain and this can often mimic symptoms of a hip flexor or hamstring tendinopathy….

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Keep on Your Toes

Post By: Mandy Blackmon PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Let’s keep you on your toes this season! Having treated dancers in the Atlanta area for 9 years, the holiday season always arrives with a bit of hope and apprehension.  My ballerinas are preparing for the Nutcracker.  My Irish step dancers are preparing for Southeastern Regional Oireachtas in Orlando. Even my adult, recreational dancers are in performance mode with upcoming events at Dance 101.  Whether you are a Snowflake or the Sugar Plum Fairy, you need to be at your best.  As much as I love treating dancers of all ages and styles, I would much rather be busy watching you all dance than treating you. So, how can we all stay…

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Motion Stability